Phase 2?

25 Feb, '06

Al-Askaris' Shrine cleanup operation has begun

A couple of days ago, an important and sacred shi’a mosque was destroyed reportedly by Wahabis or their sympathisers. Yesterday, another group again reported to be Wahabis attacked the most important oil manifold in the world in Abqaiq, a couple of hours’ drive from Bahrain. These actions are hardly indiscriminate.

In the first, a clear attempt is being made to get Iraq to enter a civil war, and had clerics from all persuasions not acted to calm the situation, the situation would have unfolded completely out of control.

My question here is who benefits from this? Would the Wahabis benefit from getting a whole country of some 20 million people to go into war which could reap a lot more deaths than the recent Gulf wars? What would they get out of it? Do they think they can get into control if they created a void? Are they simply this naive that they believe that with their terror and destabilising techniques they would mount the Iraqi throne?

Iraq is the only country in the Middle East at the moment which has a chance at true democracy. They don’t have an imposed leader, but have one they willingly elect and just as easily impeach if the circumstances presented themselves. Wouldn’t it have been better for these Wahabis to enter the democratic streams and get themselves elected to effect change? Or is their violence an acceptance and realisation by them that they have no chance of even approaching such a circle of power without the use of terror?

I think it is. The cowards have simply acceded that point. There is no way that they would be invited to a position of power in a free society; however, they will continue for a while yet to sow the seeds of sectarian warfare if Iraqis in particular, and Arabs in general don’t unite resolutely in their ugly faces.

What about Saudi then? Well, that’s a somewhat different arena as the authorities still have a semblance of control, but just. They’re going about eradicating that cancer from their midst in a futile manner, however, and rather than attacking the root causes of Wahabi terror, they’re simply patching the tears here and there. This will blow up in all our faces in the Gulf in our lifetime; probably sooner rather than later.

What the Saudis should do is introduce real democracy within their society, and by democracy I don’t mean taking 35 years to decide to allow women to drive, or to allow shops to remain open during prayer times. These are minuscule things that are not even worth thinking about, they are a given. Move on to the more important things like democratically elected councils and the true adoption of human rights.

Talking about human rights… our dear parliament seems to have thrown a spanner in the works and are refusing to sign the two treaties because the human rights treaty specifies the freedom of religion as a right, which means that changing ones religion from Islam to whatever s/he chooses is not punishable at all, let alone being punishable by death… they (Ali Mattar’s suggestion) want to be a reservation clause on that one and everything else that even slightly conflicts with the Shari’a absolving Bahrain from adopting that particular clause.

If they want to mess around with these treaties that much, they might as well roll them up and start hitting each other around the head with them. That would make them at least a lot more useful than the watered down treaties they want to foist on us.

Filed in: Politics
Tagged with:

Comments (11)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Ethan says:

    From what I read, the UN is actually considering amending the Declaration of Human rights because of the cartoon flap.

    How much would you like to bet that the Cairo Declaration of Human rights in Islam will be the model, considering the countries on the Human Rights commission?

    Never understood why Islam is so un-self-confident that it can’t stand up to criticism. Scientology is the same way – and we all know that Scientology is like that because it’s a religion built on lies. I don’t believe Islam is built on any more lies than Christianity is – so why the lack of confidence?

  2. mahmood says:

    I tend to agree with you on this Ethan. All the hullabaloo that is going on, and the requirement to chop heads if their owners leave Islam is to me nothing more than an assertion by its practitioners that Islam is genetically weak.

    I don’t believe it is. I believe that it can stand the test of time IF the more controversial issues are reinterpreted in the light of the present day and age: we don’t need to chop limbs and heads for infractions, we agree that there are different ways to reach God and those ways include the way Christians, Hindus, Jews, etc. choose to follow their own paths to reach Him, and they are not wrong in doing so. I believe that it should be more tolerant of other religions as Islam itself recognises them as religions of God, and I believe that the stratification of society based on their belief is wrong, and the so-called dhimmi system should be abolished.

    But that’s just me…

  3. Christiaan says:

    If the CIA haven’t got their dirty little hands involved in this somewhere along the line I would be very surprised.

  4. Ethan – are they amending it to say that cartoons such as these must be tolerated, or that they must not be tolerated? I can see it going either way.

  5. Bahrainiac says:

    Ethan/Mo’ – I agree with you both. I also see something quite interesting in all this. Christianity went through an “itentity crisis” a few hundered years ago, around the 1400s, I might add. Seems like Islam is just repeating history. Give it a hundred years or so and it will all work itself out.

  6. skribe says:

    Scientology is the same way – and we all know that Scientology is like that because it’s a religion built on lies.

    All religions are built on lies. That’s why there are so many of them.

  7. Augurwell says:

    Religion, hmmm the thread…. ?

    One of the oldest stories in the bible concerns a tribe from the deep desert coming out of the wilderness and encountering a foreign civilisation, that had different views and names for God. The message in the story was that their forefathers did not fear these other Gods and so neither should they.

    Also if you look closely you may note that it is written that we are created in ‘their image’, both man and woman. I understand that intelligent design and evolution are both evident in nature.

    God is good, God is great let us thank them for our food. And on that note here is an interesting story.

    Camels Going Without Water.
    &
    Bedouin legend below

    While a camel can support thirst better than any beast of burden in the world, it has a very definite limit of endurance. Almost any camel can go three or four days without a drink, especially if it has had the opportunity to fill itself before starting.

    Yet a camel which has been living in a fertile country, and has become “green.” Four days of thirst is its limit. On the fifth day, it will kneel down on the sand, and never get up again. It is useless to beat the animal or to prod him with the goad. Removing the load will make no difference. The creature will not try to get up. When a camel has once made up its mind to die, it will do so, even though water may be only an hour’s journey away. If the wells are not reached by the end of fifth day, most of the camels which are not desert-bred and desert-trained will succumb. For long trans-Saharan marches, therefore, camels from the northern parts of Algeria and Morocco are useless.

    Usually, a camel which can endure five days can endure six, and the Bedouin Arabs have a tradition that if a camel dies on the sixth day it is a sign that an afreet has been sitting on the top of the load. A well-trained desert camel should always be able to reach the evening of the seventh day, without water.

    This is the breaking point. On the morning of the eighth day, fully a third of the camels of a caravan will not even try to rise, and, at intervals, all day long, those which have started will drop to their knees, abandoning hope. A camel which, without food or water, has carried its load or its master until the evening of the ninth day, according to Bedouin tradition (though not of the Koran) has won for itself a human soul and will go to Paradise. Should the evening of the tenth day be reached and the camel still be able to travel, it is regarded as having been touched by the miraculous hand of Allah and may never be ridden again, save by a marabout in a Holy War.

    ——————————————————————————–

    There is a legend, beloved by the Bedouins, which tells how the Angel Gabriel was saved by a camel.

    “In the days of ignorance,” the legend runs, “before the Koran was revealed to Prophet, the Angel Gabriel came down to earth. As the Koran had yet been revealed, the earth was still in the hands of the demons who eat the evil thoughts of man for their food.

    “When these demons saw the Angel Gabriel, they determined to capture of the hosts of the sky, to rob him of his thoughts, as one robs a caravan, and send him back to Heaven empty. Had they succeeded in catching the Angle, they might have done this, for was it not in the days of Ignorance?

    “Now the Angel Gabriel had been given special powers by Allah, and, had he wished it, he could have blasted these demons by a Word of Might. But as his mission on earth was a secret one, escape seemed to him the best way to carry out the wishes of Allah.

    “The Angel Gabriel summoned his mehari. This racing-camel was whiter than milk, faster than the fastest gazelle, its eyes could see a blade of cram-cram grass fully ten miles away, and it could smell an unpierced well of water at two days’ march distance. The angel leaped upon this mehari and the demons folled.

    “That was a wild ride! “Every day, for exactly fourteen hours daily, the Angle Gabriel rode. He stopped, only, to give his mehari the four hours of grazing, the two hours of cud-chewing, and the four hours of sleep which the Creator-the All-Wise and the All-Powerful-has ordained for these sponge-footed racers over the desert miles.

    “Yet, fast as the angle rode, the demons stayed close behind. Upon black meharis, whose breath was hotter then the simoon upon the Waste of A’i’iz, they followed him nearly. They could not advance while he rested, for never did the Angel delay a moment longer than the prescribed house of repose, and never did he rob his mehari of the rest which was its due.

    “For nine days, the Angle Gabriel rode thus, and wide was the expanse of the desert that he crossed. And for nine days the demons maintained their pursuit, discouragement not yet having withered their harts. But when, upon the coming of the tenth day, the demons found that the mehari of the Angel Gabriel was still able to travel, those dark Sons of Eblis decided that the camel must have more than earthly powers, and gave up the chase. Thus by the endurance of a mehari to the tenth day, the Angel Gabriel was saved and the designs of Allah were not thwarted.”

    Time for a Reformation.
    ~

  8. Sun says:

    Mahmood, how about writting about the Sunni’s in Iraq being murdered everyday by the tens by or with the bleesings of the Iraq special forces. As it seems, you don’t seem to value Sunni(not Wahhabi, whatever that is) life at all.
    The Sunni killing was going on everyday before the bombing, but intensefied afterwards. Why not write a series of posts on that to balance out your pro-extremist-shia posts?

  9. mahmood says:

    Sun: As it seems, you don’t seem to value Sunni(not Wahhabi, whatever that is) life at all.

    Sorry I don’t do requests, and generally don’t respond to goads either.

    Now because I’m in a Good Morningtm mood, I’ll tell you that you’re not being very original and you must have already read Ali’s post which most definitely prompted your question.

    I have nothing to add to Ali’s story, which I agree with.

  10. Aliandra says:

    “there are different ways to reach God and those ways include the way Christians, Hindus, Jews, etc. choose to follow their own paths to reach Him, and they are not wrong in doing so”

    My sentiments exactly.

  11. Steve The American says:

    Mahmood: “My question here is who benefits from this? Would the Wahabis benefit from getting a whole country of some 20 million people to go into war which could reap a lot more deaths than the recent Gulf wars? What would they get out of it? Do they think they can get into control if they created a void? Are they simply this naive that they believe that with their terror and destabilising techniques they would mount the Iraqi throne?”

    I imagine from the Wahhabi perspective, it would be a neat trick to get Sunni and Shia to kill each other in a civil war. After all, neither side is Wahhabi and therefore not true Muslims. It is good for infidels to kill each other and so make way for Wahhabi rule.

    Mahmood: “What the Saudis should do is introduce real democracy within their society ….”

    Not gonna happen. The Saudis maintain their satanic pact with the Wahhabis, who state that democracy is blasphemy. Only Allah’s will (which is to say Wahhabi will) can rule society, not the will of man.

    To reform Saudi Arabia, first the Wahhabis must be extirpated. Without the Wahhabis, the Saudis lose their moral authority to rule. So both Wahhabis and Saudis must be swept aside for democracy to take root in Arabia. The events most likely to bring that about are a cutoff of the oil flow which subsidizes Saudi rule so the regime ends with a whimper or an armed invasion to end the evil and corrupt Saudi/Wahhabi rule so that the regime ends with a bang.

    I prefer the bang.

    Steve

Back to Top