Walla akher zaman… a poor foreign woman becomes a government minister!

20 May, '07

Hah! What is this world coming to? Don’t they have respect for class, for the local people, for men? What the hell has she got to become the Minister of Justice in France?

Rachida Dati - French justice minister

Lawyer Rachida Dati, named as French justice minister by President Sarkozy, is the first person of North African origin to hold a top government post in Paris.

She was born in 1965 to an Moroccan mason father and an Algerian mother, one of 12 children raised in humble circumstances.

At the age of 16, she started working as a carer in a private clinic.

The premature death of her mother forced her to look after her younger sisters and brothers.

“My mother was the light of my life. When I lost her, I thought I had been punished,” she says.

Working by day, learning by night, she gained degrees in both economics and law, and went on to work for various public and private companies – including a spell working as an accountant for French oil giant Elf.
profile on BBC News

She should be ashamed of herself working hard from a poor background to even dream of becoming a teacher in government schools, let alone become the Justice minister in one of the major countries in the world.

Had this been in Bahrain – or any other Arab country for that matter – we’d simply tell her to not move from her designated place and be “pragmatic”. In other words, we would tell her مشّي بوزش Ùˆ ولا في عرس أمش إتحصلين شي حتى لو تقطعت جِبدش.

I wonder if she has to breastfeed anyone now to be able to work in a mixed environment.

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Comments (24)

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  1. I wonder if she has to breastfeed anyone now to be able to work in a mixed environment.

    this is hilarious.

  2. Proud Bahraini says:

    Working by day, learning by night, she gained degrees in both economics and law, and went on to work for various public and private companies – including a spell working as an accountant for French oil giant Elf.

    Ù‘ I respect the fact that she is a hard working person, well we all know how long this new government is going to last for. MAX 1 year.

    It is a joke it is not a government especially with their new president Sarkozy, while riots were burning and inflaming in France the President was in Malta SUNBATHING now isn’t that funny.

    And the way the new President speaks, his ideals, his political stand and his attack against Iran makes you wonder if Almighty Bush is breast feeding the words.

    It was much better when the labour party ruled the government in my own opinion.

  3. Barry says:

    I wonder if she has to breastfeed anyone now to be able to work in a mixed environment.

    Mahmood: Mr. Azhari will probably say she needs to in order for them to feel more “comfortable” (Oh NOEZ! More censuring! I am obviously morally corrupt! and a part of totalitarianism!).

    No my man, all she needs to do, especially since she IS French is hold up the French Flag, and bare her breasts!

    http://www.linearossage.it/images/liberty.JPG

    That French painting is proof!

    No chemically induced lactation, or men with their lips wrapped around her nipples needed!

  4. Haithem says:

    You’re comments say it all. Not only are we retarded, but misogynists, arrogant and classists as well. Way to go mister, very educating, indeed!

  5. can we talk says:

    Had this been in Bahrain – or any other Arab country for that matter – we’d simply tell her to not move from her designated place and be “pragmatic”. In other words, we would tell her مشّي بوزش Ùˆ ولا في عرس أمش إتحصلين شي حتى لو تقطعت جِبدش.

    do you really think so mahmood? or are you becoming too disheartened and cynical?
    I would like to think that even in this country, if you work hard you can still make it. it is harder, but i think the ones being told to “mishoo boozkum” are not the ones who are poor and humble and climbed out of it, but the ones whose relatives for whatever reason, usually unfairly, they want to teach a lesson. i don’t think it is poverty.

    in fact i think the humble background stigma comes more from the general public than from people in high places.
    example whenever you hear someone was appointed somewhere, you always hear somebody say “him? him? i don’t believe it! i remember him from the fireej (translation: the hood) with his sanaseen!! (translation: snot).”
    as if they weren’t sanaseeny themselves when they were five.

    because this place is so small, everyone knows everyone else’s life story, and we HAVE had people in the past in Bahrain reach high positions who come from very simple backgrounds.

  6. moodz says:

    I will have to agree with “Can we Talk” on this, foreigners actually have a better chance to reach leading roles (in organizations) here in Bahrain, maybe not in the ministries but we all know what it takes to reach a ministerial level in this country, and it has nothing to do with past achievements, career, or educational qualification.

    I think you are mistaking the common stereotype which dictates how the average Bahraini feels about the “newly naturalized citizens” with this, but who is to blame really eh?

  7. mahmood says:

    No, not at all CWT and Moodz.

    Do you believe, even for a second, that a citizen of this country – regardless of his or her naturallisation status – has an equal opportunity to that of a Frenchman or woman?

    Why not?

    This is not cynicism at all, what it is is the truth, and until we get to that stage then we (as a society) will just look at horizons and never ever have the confidence to dream that we can breach them.

  8. can we talk says:

    ok, what so you think is her handicap here, that a bahraini would not be able to overcome? is it the humble beginnings or is it being naturalized?

    now i don’t include the highest positions in the land (the top two), but other than that, i think it’s fair game.

    As far as humble bsginnings, we have had ministers from very humble beginnings already so that us not an issue

    and as far as naturalization is concerned this has not been an issue yet, but it will be when the kids of those newly naturalized come of age. you watch the schools and the universities. many of these naturalized come from very competitive cultures, unlike us, and you will see that they will get the best scholarships and come back and get the best jobs. this has already started. just you wait a few years and when these kids come back after graduating from the best universities in the world they will get the best jobs too, and i will remind you.

    it’s just a matter of time.

  9. mahmood says:

    but other than that, i think it’s fair game.

    no it’s not.

    Some ministries are regarded as sovereign; hence, can only be presided over by a member of the royal family.

    Okay, let me explain: the post is obviously sarcastic and alludes to the disparity in our two cultures; France – representing democratic regimes – allows equal opportunities to all its citizens which of course is not the case here; hence, my allusion of striving to untouchable horizons.

    I am sure I don’t have to go to examples, as they are available aplenty and you know them as well if not more than I.

  10. I says:

    CWT,
    “many of these naturalized come from very competitive cultures, unlike us, and you will see that they will get the best scholarships and come back and get the best jobs”

    Do you mean to say that they are prepared to work harder than others to get the job ? ? ?

    What, exactly, is wrong with that ?

    I

  11. Dibujante says:

    10I .. the wrong with that i think is …. “”””some”””” bahrainis will stop getting payed for reading newspapers and drinking tea all day and having the bahraini usual sick leave every now and then ,,,, they will start to work harder to earn money … and thats a nightmare for some ppl …

  12. can we talk says:

    Do you mean to say that they are prepared to work harder than others to get the job ? ?
    What, exactly, is wrong with that ?

    in a way, yes. i think that the culture of charity and makramas and people getting ahead even though they are not always the best people for the job historically, and add to that the mentality of our parliament have helped to create a lazy society which does not believe that they will necessarily get anywhere by working hard.

    yes there are some lazy people, but we are not all lazy. most of us are hardworking. personally i believe the lazy ones are the ones are at the bottom of the scale, with low pay. those of us who earn not a lot but a semi-decent salary are hard-working.
    on the other hand, the ones i mentioned in my previous post come from countries where they stand no chance against all the competition and they are hungry and driven. no there is nothing wrong with that, i didnt say there was. what i said was that even though they are immigrants newly naturalized, they WILL manage to get very good jobs in the future in this country, which this thread was kind of saying that they had no chance to. i think their chances are very good, better than most, in fact. not for the top posts and the holy ministries, but the other ministries certainly. i wouldnt be surprised if in a few short years we have ministers from newly naturalized bahrainis. locals might be resentful, but it will happen.

    “”””some”””” bahrainis will stop getting payed for reading newspapers and drinking tea all day and having the bahraini usual sick leave every now and then

    will you guys stop spreading rumours. please, let me ask you a question:

    i am assuming you are bahraini. correct me if i’m wrong.
    do you have a job? do you honestly feel that that describes you (getting paid for newspaper reading and tea drinking)?

  13. can we talk says:

    why is it that one post gets delayed while later ones go through immediately? does it have anything to do with the length of the post? or key words we should avoid? this is my second and the first didnt show up yet!

  14. mahmood says:

    The bad word must have been “parliament”! You shouldn’t have done that! 😈

    Sorry CWT, unfortunately it got stopped (but there is only one comment in the queue which I have released now) and I have no earthly idea why.

    Tell me something, do you actually log in before commenting or do you just enter your username and email address in the comment form? I just want to know if logged-in members actually get blocked too, I wouldn’t think so as I believe that they will have a higher priority and avoid the spam queue, but I could be wrong.

    Again, sorry for the inconvenience.

  15. can we talk says:

    for myself, my name and email are already typed in whenever i open your site, so i never have to do anything

  16. mahmood says:

    Ah, that’s the cookie then with stored entries. Could you please click here and login with your username and password (if you have registered previously that is, else, go through the registration process and choose a password then log in) and let’s see if the spam filter ignores your entries (if they have less than 5 links) from then on.

  17. Ingrid says:

    Wow, I like what she’s wearing! (how shallow I know) She looks great and what a strenght she must have. Good for her!
    Ingrid

  18. Dibujante says:

    CWT

    yes i’m bahraini and i do work…. unfortunately in a ministry … im educated in UK .. hence i know the meaning of professionalism … my problem is that i do work hard and do my job … while the next guy do the minimal work if any… and get paid as much as me if not more … and give us bahraini’s the bad name…. i know there are so many hard working bahrainis all over the place .. private and gov sectors …. but believe me i would prefer a non bahraini or a “new” bahraini hard working employee than the samples u find in most ministries ..

  19. 3keel says:

    It took a country like France to bring about a woman of an arab background into such an impotant position ,as an arab I have to admire france ,after all this is not the first time that france has done some things for us arabs, thanks for the typewriter france

  20. Mike says:

    Interesting to see where the discussion quickly changed to talking about a persons ethnic origins rather than their true accomplishments as stated in the original post. Perhaps that in itself should speaks volumes.

  21. Anonymous says:

    Congratulation Ms. Dati 😀 Her success is a testament to the rain drain that is mete out on this Ummah 🙄

  22. Maverick says:

    I wonder if she has to breastfeed anyone now to be able to work in a mixed environment.

    Does this mean that males from here visiting areas there where females are present have to be breastfed by the women present to ensure that everything is okey dokey. What if they are lactose intolerant? Is there soy milk substitute available? 🙄 😡 👿 😈 :mrgreen:

  23. Maverick says:

    You really cracked me up M! Sometime your sense of humour is just kills me. 😉 😆

  24. Karim says:

    This indeed was a cynical post and certainly not an intelligent one.

    In 2003 alone, there were 6 women ministers in Tunisia, 5 in Algeria, 3 in Jordan, 2 in Egypt, Palestine and Syria and one in Yemen, Sudan, Morocco and Qatar.

    President Bush was also the first one to appoint a latino-American as a chief of justice: Attorney General Alberto Gonzales.

    The honorable Alberto Gonzales was also the one who authorized torture (i mean tough interrogations!), and spying on US citizens (Muslim-Americans and anti-war activists). And don’t forget Gitmo.

    Why doesn’t Mahmood read up more on the plan of the new French justice minister? She already said that she wants to lock up more people in French prisons.

    It’s a good start Mr. Mahmood, isn’t it? But again, as long as she is a minority who cares what she stands for!

    When the French justice ministry locks up in prison more French Arabs/Muslims, they will this time get a way with it quite easily: The French minister is one of them, she can abuse of them if she wants! it is not racism.

    Very disappointed.

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