Divided Island?

29 Jul, '07

Al-Jazeera English’s Abdulrahman Al-Shayyal produced a short documentary to explore the sectarian divide in Bahrain. He came and interviewed me amongst many other Bahrainis to find out the underlying reason that these tensions exist.

Here’s the segment he produced:

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Comments (35)

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  1. Aisha M says:

    Hey Mahmood,

    This is ages old…how come you didn’t put it up when it came out. Caught it on TV myself…no offence but what terrible shite…AWFUL reporting at its best…and that group of barely coherent people talking crap…how is that relevant to the topic :S…must admit ur part was great though…love ur accent 😀 😀

  2. Butterfly says:

    The documentary didn’t add much, but what I liked most about it is the youth camp part. Those young bahrainis are promising and more open-minded than our MPs!

  3. alshayyal says:

    Thanks for sticking it up Mahmood.
    Aisha M: Thanks for your comments! I will take them on board then see what happens 🙂 (“awful reporting at it’s best” should really be edited/corrected. Criticizing whilst making mistakes undermines your own credibility)
    Butterfly: It wasn’t intended to add much – remember that the vast majority of the English speaking world don’t have a clue about Bahrain or the problems it faces.

    In general it was an interesting exercise for me – I also had to cut down over 14 hours of footage into that incredibly short film. So many things had to be taken out which could have got alot of people into trouble – and seeing as those people trusted me in an incredibly sincere and very frank way – that was not something I was prepared to do.
    There will be something far longer and more in-depth – certainly it would have been nicer to get more youth and bloggers on board…however I wasn’t able to get any.
    Just in terms of the very modest impact it had, let me tell you that my inbox was full of people writing to me to tell me they had no idea what was going on in Bahrain and now they have begun reading more on Bahrain and it’s people…so for me that was a really small thing I did for a country I truly love and adore.

  4. Samboosa says:

    This report is criminal…surely those kids swinging on the Tree of Life should be prosecuted.
    Mahmood, at least all that gardening paid off…!

    On a serious note…i thought the CNN report was more entertaining in presentation and impact, and also much more critical of the government than this report. Nevertheless any exposure is good.

  5. moodz says:

    Ok away from the content of the clip, it’s all fine and well educational for the non Bahraini. But has anyone spotted those kids playing on the branch of the tree of life!? You are talking more than 12 kids altogether sitting and shaking one of the branches like it’s a see-saw! this is supposed to be one of the main symbols and attractions of the country for gods sake! MP Ghanim AlBuainin (AlAsala) is apparently sitting there and enjoying the scene too!

  6. Nawaf says:

    AlShaayal,

    First of all, thank you for the effort to shed light on this very disturbing issue in Bahrain.
    I was just really surprised that:

    1) Ordinary citizens’ opinions (The poor shittes described in the video) were not a part of your report.

    2) No government offical was interviewed as part of your report

    3) No background of Bahrain was presented especially significant since this report is airing to westerners who know nothing of Bahrain

    However, I really liked the similarity between Bahrain’s history and the tree of life! 🙂

    I think this issue couldn’t be well represented in a news report without a more in-depth investigation, research and interviewing incompassing the multitude of reasons for these hateful sectarian feelings in Bahrain.

  7. Yet another poorly thought of and poorly directed report about Bahrain.

    First of all, who said anything about a problem between Sunni people and Shiiat? the problem is between the Sunni regime and every one else, you can’t run a country this way, it may look like there is a problem between Sunni and shiiat people but that’s what the government makes it look like and what our bad representation in the parliament makes it look like, I mean, just look at both buffoons in the report, that speaks for it self, as a matter of fact, many Sunnis have problems with Imported Sunnis while they are married from Shiiat family.
    Why is It when these channels just want to do a report on such a controversial topic, with out doing the correct home work, these kind of reports will slowly but surely create a problem between “the people”, as if its not enough from the inside with the likes of Isa Qasem, Mshaimia, Mohamed Khaled and many others.
    And why is it that many people think the Sunni people are rich in general and Shiiat are all under the limits of poverty!! By percentage, shiiat have more business, more high ranked emplyees, and more inherited wealth (Al-A’ali family, Al-arayedh (and like 6 ministers!), Al-Jishi, Jawad, Modafie, Al-Zeera, Al-Hadad, Al-Alawi, Al-Bahrana), the names I mentioned are full fledged merchants and real business men who actually made something in and for this country, now can some one please show me one sunny business man, and I mean Sunni not “Holee”!!
    I agree, we do have a problem when it comes to income distribution, but that is not solely distributed amongst Sunni people and the shiiat are left out, no it is divided between a few members of the royal family and some other vampires that help and cover, regardless of their believes.
    And did I hear him say people living in tents! Dude that’s camping season, and that is the only area people are allowed in, try talking about that.

    @Mahmood, Nice back yard.
    @ Butterfly, these young Bahraini’s in the camp are mostly members of the liberal party, Waad.
    @moodz, those 12 kids are mostly likely imported!

  8. mahmood says:

    Abdulrahman, you made a couple of booboos in the report too, when you introduced Reem Khalifa with “Al-Wasat” logo hugely emblazoned on the background, you introduced her as from “Al-Watan”!

    Then “tents” thing is as Eyad suggested.

    All in all it was a good attempt, but could have been done a lot better. You were trying to cram too many things into a limited space of time which watered the whole piece and left your viewers wondering what your message actually was.

  9. Nawaf says:

    Eyad the great,

    In response to: “who said anything about a problem between Sunni people and Shiiat?”

    This is the kind of self-illusion rhetoric that is not helpful and devaites from the reality of the problem.

    There IS a problem between SOME (not really a small some) sunnis and some Shiites in Bahrain. You see sectarian hateful feelings in schools, universities, workplaces, news forums, blogs, mosques, the press… It is a reality and a sad one.

    A proper way to describe the problem is that it didn’t exsist 50 or even 10 years ago. Mataams on Ashoura were filled with Sunnis coming to participate the memory of Imam Hussain, Sunnis and Shiites prayed in each others’ mosques with no fuss created, marrying from diffrent sects was more prominent and caused no objections amongst family members. In a nutshell, differences between the sects were minimal and dismissable.

    Now, in 2007, you could see the full effect of years of government sponsored and even paid for propoganda (Not dismissing the fact that these feelings were heightned with the events unfolding in Iraq):

    1) YouTube videos posted by Bahrainis insulting and ridiculing the shiites (الصوفيين أو الروافضة).
    2) Hatred socked pamphelts distributed at mosques’ doorways
    3)The demonstration in front of the Iranian embassy protesting Sharam…izi’s comments turned from denouncing the officials’ comments into an anti-shiites rally!
    4)The hush-hush Al-B….. report

    The responsibility of solving this problem is first of all for to ACCEPT and ACKNOWLEDGE the exsistence of a problem. Second of all, uniting prominent members of society from both sects to NOT just issuing press statements but to put some REAL effort in bringing both sects closer just like the late Sheikh AlJamri and members of Al-Eslah Soceity did in 1995 when they brought both sects together despite heightened tensions and governmental efforts.

    http://www3.0zz0.com/2006/12/28/14/92703670.jpg

  10. Yvonne Dettwyler says:

    Nawaf

    spot on. The problem also exists between Sunnis in Egypt.. Schoolchildren in foreign schools questioning other Muslim children if they are Muslims bearing foreign names. (Fathers khawaghas, mothers Egyptian Muslims) Some children get harassed badly suffer crying spells begging their mothers for a change of name.

    Small 9 year olds inquisition soldiers? Why attend foreign schools? Children parrot what they hear at home.

  11. alshayyal says:

    Thanks for that Mahmood and the others:)
    I think the issue is not only the Government and the Shi’a…it is also between the sunni and the shi’a. After all (at least on the sunni side) I know many who will smile openly at shi’a people and say how great they are and that there are no problems with the shi’a…then behind close doors swear at them and ask Allah to take them all off the face of the earth. These are neither government officials nor are they even involved in politics – they are average sunni citizens of Bahrain, Saudi, Qatar, Kuwait and other Arab countries.
    Its a sad fact i think. I also think that the onus is on the clergy to clearly state that partial/total difference of opinion should not lead to hatred…
    And I would disagree with Eyad on the sunni/shi’a wealth distribution. Whilst many shi’a families in Bahrain (and in other gulf countries) are very wealthy, so too are the sunnis – in greater proportion. Sunni and not hooli is a rather racist (and unacademic) way of making your point! Sunni/shi’a are sects…holi is an ethnic grouping so you can’t really say I mean sunni not Holi. Furthermore If you mean to say of true Bahraini origin and not Iranian, then that is rather racist…are the huwala not bahraini? or should they have been there for a few hundred years at least? But then does that make those families who have been there for more than 500 years more bahraini than the 300 year old families?! and what about those who have been there for just fifty…or maybe more than 1000?! I mean at the end of the day the beauty of Bahrain is in its diversity and how it blends so many different cultures and traditions….

  12. Enas says:

    True, as is the case all over the world. Rednecks and KKK followers in the states. Fundamentilist Jews in Isreal. Anglo chauvinists in the UK and Nazi followers in Germany.

    Is that what our society is being compared to? Is that how we portray ourselves? How depressing..

    I too went to school and was educated in Bahrain and have both shiaa and sunni friends and family alike. Never faced any resentment except once by a UOB Professor who now works with one of the Human Rights Societies (ouch what a terrible thought).

    As a nation, we choose what issues we want to politicize. There has always been an issue whith intermarriage relations. Shia-Sunni, Ajam/Bahrani, Howlie/Arab, Howlie/Ajam, Arab/Bahrani …..) understandable, marriage is very difficult in itself, you don’t need to add to it but that remains a personal choice. Apart from that I feel that we are taking it one step forward and turning it into more than what it really is.

    Shayyal: Many conflicting messages in your reportage, no paticular focus, basically you are swaying both ways which doesn’t quite reflect us Bahrainis, who you seem to love so much, properly. All the best on your next production nevertheless.

    Mahmood, yakhi chan libast thobe 🙂

  13. mahmood says:

    Ma kan fi thobe yinlibis thak ilyoum, tha’aft wajid min el taiha! 😎

  14. And I would disagree with Eyad on the sunni/shi’a wealth distribution. Whilst many shi’a families in Bahrain (and in other gulf countries) are very wealthy, so too are the sunnis – in greater proportion. Sunni and not hooli is a rather racist (and unacademic) way of making your point! Sunni/shi’a are sects…holi is an ethnic grouping so you can’t really say I mean sunni not Holi. Furthermore If you mean to say of true Bahraini origin and not Iranian, then that is rather racist…are the huwala not bahraini? or should they have been there for a few hundred years at least? But then does that make those families who have been there for more than 500 years more bahraini than the 300 year old families?! and what about those who have been there for just fifty…or maybe more than 1000?! I mean at the end of the day the beauty of Bahrain is in its diversity and how it blends so many different cultures and traditions….

    Alshayyal, did you read my post clearly, or your just trying to hide facts and drive the conversation to a deferent route?
    My point here is that not all sunna are rich, and gave and examples, why do you want to make an issue out of this and went as far as calling me raciest, do you even know me? I didn’t say something wrong, some like Nawaf here disagree with me and have really put in a good argument and I believe his statement was clearer than mine and is also very correct.
    It is really shameful that characters such as your self are also responsible for creating sectarian hatred.
    Can you please explain to me in detail how the Sunni families are wealthier in greater proportion?
    Ya5y ilnas wain o int wain, why are you trying to keep pointing out that the problems are between government and shiiat, or shiiat and sunna? The government may look like its siding with the Sunna, but its only siding with Sunna that are serving the government the way they want them to, same thing with the shiiat, well, take majeed al-Alawi as an example.
    If you have nothing but the old racism hanger to hang on, I suggest that you dig deep inside your head and get a better argument, check my last post to see how racist I am, what I’m trying to say is very clear, I believe, and I’m not raciest to any level, My father is sunni, my mother is comes from a very sheeie family and my fiancé is Blue blood Holya, people are all the same to me, and if my “imported“ comments got into you, I apologize really, but the topic was supposed to be discussed in the report, if u still didn’t get it, I was referring to naturalization.
    If you are offended that I didn’t like your report, don’t be, take these comments and have some guide lines for your next one, there were many mistakes in the report and I personally think it does not help the issue in hand and it does not reflect the reality of things, and I still think its poorly thought of and poorly directed.

  15. Yvonne Dettwyler says:

    Pls read what troubles brew in Egypt. Compare with your situation I would love to hear more abt. Bahrein. The contents of the site correct.
    http://egyptianchronicles.blogspot.com/ All of you Bahreinis on this blessed site educated, this your strength AND allowed more to air your views in comparison to ET. Also watch the audio.video of Muslims in America on the given site. The more you know, the better all of you may find a solution to this ghastly problem the world taken over by all sorts of fundis, think of your children what they inherit.

  16. alshayyal says:

    Actually – I wasn’t offended at all by your post eyad; secondly if you read my posts you would have also seen that I mentioned how there are problems between the two sects regardless of politics…and I don’t think anyone can deny that.
    I am not hanging my argument on any “hanger”; I think you just didn’t understand a straightforward point. You said: “the names I mentioned are full fledged merchants and real business men who actually made something in and for this country, now can some one please show me one sunny business man, and I mean Sunni not “Holee”!!” I won’t bother pointing out how inconsistant that sentence was…or maybe I will! I mean sunni not Holee doesn’t work here because the two (as you obviously know) are not mutually exclusive. Thus the underlying message in your post is somewhat racist – or at least discriminatory.
    Furthermore if you were referring to naturalisation, where exactly do you draw the line? Do you promote revoking the citizenship of ‘the holi and not sunny businessmen’? It’s a big issue that can’t be solved easily.
    In terms of the wealth, I do stand by my statement; what proportion of Bahraini shi’as are middle and lower class? and what proportion of Bahraini Sunnis are lower and middle class? And how many sunnis are there and how many shi’as are there? I think even if you give rough answers to those questions, you will agree with me (unless you think there are more poor sunnis and more sunnis than shi’as in bahrain).
    Finally, and maybe this is the only thing I actually got irked at although I don’t know you and you don’t know me (i think!)was when you said: “It is really shameful that characters such as your self are also responsible for creating sectarian hatred.” That is really not the nicest thing I’ve been told but I guess thats what the internet is for!

  17. @alshayyal, I agree that some of my comments were politically incorrect, but are not racist in any way, shape or form, and I do admit that I havnet used the best of examples, but will you admit that the report could have been better and that the shape it was aired in is wrong?
    the number of low income shiiat in Bahrain is bigger due to the fact that there are more shiiat than Sunna in Bahrain, but the jobs that Sunni people are favored in are in the military or MOI, thats low income mate, yes it is every Bahraini’s right to work there but is it a good base to say that all Sunni people in Bahrain are rich and the opposite for Shiiat?
    And Yes, characters such as your self do help in sectarian Hatred, you know why?
    It is you who create televised reports, and if your reports are in accurate such is the one posted above, then you sir do contribute in increasing the sectarian hatred in this country, nothing personal here, I just tend to get too aggressive sometimes, thank god I’m not a politician.
    Let’s not turn this into a flaming war, good luck with the next report.

  18. alshayyal says:

    Eyad: no way! sorry but you can’t gloss over things, then throw in your opinion and say: “Let’s not turn this into a flaming war, good luck with the next report”. Come on, if you are going to discuss then at least give me the chance to say:
    1) the standard of my piece – good/bad/terrible has nothing to do with your point “the number of low income shiiat in Bahrain is bigger due to the fact that there are more shiiat than Sunna in Bahrain, but the jobs that Sunni people are favored in are in the military or MOI, thats low income mate, yes it is every Bahraini’s right to work there but is it a good base to say that all Sunni people in Bahrain are rich and the opposite for Shiiat?”. I never said all sunnis are rich and all shi’as are poor. Low income is still income. It doesn’t make you a millionaire but it does make you live a better life than no income…I am surprised you can’t see that.
    Getting aggressive isn’t a good thing. At least you admit it. However if you feel that the piece increased sectarian tensions, then my apologies. I don’t think it would make one sect hate another!

  19. um naief says:

    eyad the great,

    i’m more like an outsider, but i saw the divide between sunni and shi’a while working in the govt sector… and it’s big.

    there were MANY that put down shi’a’s and many shia’s that put down sunnis. it happened on a daily basis.

    not only that, but i was told by sunni’s that i should have NEVER become a shi’a…. and then they’d go on to tell me all that’s wrong about the shi’a community and the religion. these women weren’t the first….

    in EVERY job i’ve had here, i’ve had sunni’s do the same to me… every time.

    but… they were closed minded ppl. bright and open minded individuals aren’t like this, i have since found out.

    so… you are wrong… there is a strong divide here w/ many.

  20. @Abdulrahman AlShayyal:

    I do think the way the report was presented will help increase sectarian tensions, and that is should be presented in another way, however, this is my opinion which I am entitled of and I’m not going to claim that I would know how to make such a report. But, many things in the report were wrong or presented in weak fashion in my opinion.

    First of all, the report was started with “ruled and discriminated against by the Sunni minority” this is wrong, Bahrain is not ruled by the Sunni minority, As Abdulrahman AlNuaimi said in the report “the government represents its self as Sunni one” that is the reality of things, the discrimination in Bahrain is a creature of many wrong moves by the government, such as naturalization, by that I don’t mean the great people that migrated to Bahrain regardless of the country they migrated from, what I mean is all the Syrians, Jordanian, Pakistani..etc people that have been forced on the society by the government to increase the number of Sunni citizens first of all, and the have them used as a whip against many in the 90’s and before that, these being favored in employment in the police and defense force created a shortage of positions to employ many other Shiiat as well as Sunni people, I can tell you from being around many people who have been waiting for such a small position in the Army or Defense force, these people are my school friends as well as some relatives, Shiiat and Sunni, Sunni people have an- an written or spoken priority, but they are still discriminated against and not treated the same even after they are employed, there are many restrictions on the good positions in those 2 major forces such as fighter pilots, Engineers of any field, and many others.

    Other than where the government went wrong, there are other factors that effected the relationship between the 2 major sects in Bahrain, Reem Khaleefa a motioned a nice point that if I understood correctly agree with a 100% “there are many signals of sectarian hatred” these signals are feed by a few people and are encouraged by those who see the separation as their bread and butter, be it Sunni or Shiiat, with out that, there is no reason for there over glorified roles, to mention a few of those, the left over’s of the old national security, some Shaikhs and Mulla’s, it might even go as far as MP’s but those are all assumptions, by me at least.
    I hope this clears another bit of My point of view.
    @um_Niaef, Damned he who say there wont be patriotism for sects, if the Shiakhs and Mulla’s went as far as calling the other sect none muslims and declared that killing them is indeed a form of Jihad what do you expect from your average Joe?
    It did come closer to the surface in the past few years, and it is increasing, and that is why we should be careful on how to deal with such issues and address them, it is a nose itching gas leak waiting for the slightest of sparks to burst wiping out anything this nation was proud of at any point of time.
    All what I’m saying is that we should be more subjective and try to show the problem as it stands, not dig the old roots and get our self in bigger problems instead of solving the ones in Hand.
    The least we need now is to be patriotic or even heroic.

    Sigh.

  21. I Choose to be Myself A proud Bahraini Not Shiite nor Sunni, Not Ba7rani, Persian or An Arab, I choose to be Bahraini.

    For the love of everything that is beautiful at least in Bahrain they don’t inspect you for a tail, there is sectarian hatred but mostly from non Bahrainis or brainwashed youth that think they found they way to heaven.

  22. Grace says:

    I second that “Proud bahraini”.

    Cheers,

  23. Just me says:

    What is it with all these arab journalists working for english channels internalising the orientalist world view of a romantic image of the sun-setting on the horizon accompanied by the evocative sound of flute and oud strumming while at the same time portraying the people through the dichotomy of age-old sectarian antagonism.

    It is quite shameful that the journalist himself admits above that he was trying to portray sectarian trouble beyond the politics. As if as Bahrainis all we ever talk about is how much we hate our co-religionists. What I think eyad is saying above that that conflict did not exist before Alkhalifa’s divide and rule policy or the war in Iraq. That Bahrain is quite harmonious and that this sectarianism has gone mainstream only recently. Unfortunately the report should have been a bit more nuanced beyond the portrayal of the shia victims, the sunni oppresors. Why didn’t the editor/producer try to find normal sunnis/shias who actually do coexist peacefully? Although discrimination is mentioned, why was no mention of the Albandar report made which is proof of a state-propogated conspiracy to promote sectarianism? The media needs to move beyond simplifying issues to address and convey the nuances of our problems. Although I understand it is difficult to do this in a 6 minute film, but that is where creativity and talent is supposed to come into play, and unfortunately a bunch of clumped interviews that got a bit repetitive did not quite do that. The journalist should have focused on the struggle for progress and development, individual stories, the people’s struggle for change and live up to the tile, People and Power. For example, why didn’t the report mention how the government prevented any liberal nationalists from winning a single seat in parliament just so the stage is left open for shia and sunni parties to ravish over the regime’s leftover spoils.

    As Bahrainis we need to do more however, maybe we should write to Aljazeera producers with our issues.

  24. alshayyal says:

    Thanks for that Just Me…
    I actually got more than three hours (total) of different Bahrainis (political activists and ordinary people) mentioning the bandar report in great detail. I also got every single one of them calling me to ask me to omit their comments and/or take them out entirely after a leading activist was imprisoned. Seeing as he was imprisoned about six hours after I spent the day with him and I left Manama a day after that I think I had to make a decision on whether to put all of them in or not…Your point on individual stories is a great one however and certainly what I am intending to do in a far better way. All in all the report could have been approached far differently and certainly something more in depth is in the pipeline.
    On how the government prevented liberal nationalists; images are what any person will need to bring that on film…even Abdurrahman AlNumaimi didn’t tell me he was prevented by the government; are there images of the government actually preventingcandidates? Maybe you could say people backed by government fought smear campaigns against the liberal nationalists but that is different from the government preventing them from winning…

  25. Enas says:

    Al-Shayyal: You are missing the point here. When comparing your peice with other reports, it seems very low budget not low key …
    Why would the presenter be standing in the dessert in Qatar? Why would the music in the background be indian? Why would you show seemingly underprivilaged children playing on a branch as if it were a see saw.
    More to come….

  26. Anonny says:

    Al Shayyal,

    I thought the doco was shallow. Any media
    studies graduate could have done it. Enas
    is right about the music and the setting
    and Eyad made some intelligent points.

    The BBC and their ilk make these documentaries
    all over the world and afterwards the
    problems seem to get bigger, not go away.
    Think about the law of attraction and
    try allowing people to thing about the
    positives for a change.

    I know Bahrainis who have stopped watching
    Al-Jazeera. They call it “Tension TV”
    because that’s what it’s causing. It’s
    divide and rule again and Arab media
    studies graduates are falling for it.
    When problems have their roots that go
    back centuries, talking can sometimes
    make things worse. You can’t forget
    differences by highlighting differences.

    We all know about the Sunni-Shia divide
    and we all know about past injustice.
    Let’s stop picking at scabs. Let’s stop treating history like a balance sheet
    and start working together like good
    human beings, eh?

  27. Anonny says:

    Erratum: try allowing people to think
    about the positives for a change

  28. Butterfly says:

    You can’t forget differences by highlighting differences

    Very true.

    and if CNN or BBC has produced similar documentaries in the past it doesn’t mean that what they produced was great and that other networks should follow their lead.

  29. mahmood says:

    This discussion certainly resulted in great ideas for further documentaries! I particularly like the ideas proposed by Just Me and I would like to explore them further.

    There are also a heap of ideas of even just small segments for many Just Bahraini campaigns too!

    I’ve ordered my video camcorder last week and they promise to deliver within 4 – 6 weeks… I suppose I should download the manual and start the storyboards and scripts.

    Anyone fancy lending a hand or two?

  30. Adel says:

    What site do you use for ordering stuff on the internet Mahmood?

  31. mahmood says:

    Nah… as we are the distributors for Sony Broadcast & Professional Systems in Bahrain, just placed an order with them directly.

    That would mean that I would enjoy the full warranty of course, and good pricing.

    The camcorder, should you care to know, is the now ubiquitous HVR-Z1E

  32. Redbelt says:

    I just hate that awful buddha bar like music whenever something “A-rab” comes on TV for forigners.
    I mean what is that? really?
    Can’t you play khalid alshaikh or Ali bahar for example?
    Seriously though, if they need authentic they could use old diving melodies.
    But this (and anything 1001 nights like) sucks.

    Off topic but irks me everytime

  33. mahmood says:

    I couldn’t find the diving music! I would love to use it, can you lead me to where it might be sold?

  34. Anonny says:

    I just hate that awful buddha bar like music whenever something “A-rab” comes on TV for forigners.
    I mean what is that? really?
    Can’t you play khalid alshaikh or Ali bahar for example?
    Seriously though, if they need authentic they could use old diving melodies.
    But this (and anything 1001 nights like) sucks.

    Off topic but irks me everytime

    It’s been a pain forever. Years of finding
    apt music and getting paid local rates in
    the local market, and then outsiders come
    in and do stuff with big fat budgets and
    you get to hear Arabian nights with sitars
    behind a rushed and badly-directed Arabic
    voice-over. So unfair.

    OK, enough whining from me ..

  35. Anonny says:

    I couldn’t find the diving music! I would love to use it, can you lead me to where it might be sold?

    You can source this at the ministry
    of information. But that’s been done
    rather often, Mahmood. It’ll be another
    cliche if not used sparingly.

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