Priceless!

15 Nov, '07

Wagdi Ghoneim desperately looking for the formula to become a Bahraini

Gahfia (skullcap) — BD0.500
Ghutra (headcloth) — BD 6.000
Ugall (fanbelt) — BD 3.000
Thobe (dress) — BD 12.000

Thinking that BD 21.500 would make you a Bahraini… PRICELESS!

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Comments (29)

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  1. Mavis says:

    Google translator didn’t do a good job of translating, but from the gist of it, he seems to be back peddling. Brown nosing everyone that is anyone, just to stay in country.

  2. Hamad says:

    Well Mahmood I would support you that all the dress he wear doesn’t make him Bahraini but what im wondering what is the definition of Bahraini ???? Is it middle dark skin person ? Badwee ? working for government entities from other nations ? land on Bahrain 6 months back ? what makes some one Bahraini is big question that have no answers . I have born on Bahrain and lived for 29 years till today I never wear this 22 BD thing trying to not push my self into this society because I respect the love the original people have to there land but why people like me face this unfair treatment . I meet lot of people spend on Bahrain less than 5 years and having passport and walk like a citizen and a person like me grow on this land among the villages and normal people of this country and treated like a stranger enter Bahrain yesterday why ? because we are not part of any political game on this country we don’t support one against other we love every one was from any group that’s what makes us non Bahraini .

    I didn’t support or like or watch this man ever . The words what makes you Bahraini pull my attention only .

    I wish him nice flight back to Egypt .

    Hamad

  3. Nawaf says:

    To me, the true definition of a Bahraini, put simply, is one who would gladly give his life for this country.

    I’m guessing wajdi ghoneim, half of bahrain’s security forces, and the 20,000 people who rigged last year’s election will definately not fit this definition.

  4. ammaro.com says:

    mahmood wahahahhahahahahahaahahahahahaha 😆

  5. Ali says:

    To me, the true definition of a Bahraini, put simply, is one who would gladly give his life for this country.

    In 1990, a lot of expats stayed in August and were prepared to dig in and face the Iraqis coming over the Causeway, the receptionist at the British Club was even overheard to say
    ” unless a member signs them in they are not coming in here…” and I am sure that would have been the case.

    There are many expats who have lived here from East and West who deserve citizenship becasue they work for us and have given us the best part of their lives. They are loyal to all sides of the sectarian divide.

    So good riddance to this jerk.

  6. m.noor says:

    “…and this is how Sh. Wajdi entered the global book of ‘Priceless!’ jokes…” :mrgreen:

    LMAO… where did you get the picture Mahmood-Bey?
    It reminds me of the Bahraini version of Mr. Bean which we all seen before 😀 . In the above picture Sh. Wajdi looks like my deeply-respected teacher & friend Sh. Abdul Lateef Al-Mahmood 💡 . Rofl (I hope Sh. A.Lateef will have a sport spirit about this 🙄 )

    Although I am Bahraini (ehm… *coughholicough* 😎 ) Wearing Ghutra (Bahraini Bandana… lmfaorofl~!) has never appeal to me, because of the lack of ventilation it creates 😛 ; which may cause dampness and odor of hair for some, or even baldness for others.

    I wonder why most of GCC national dress codes include a head piece 😯 ? Does anyone know why ❓

  7. mahmood says:

    what is the definition of Bahraini

    Technically you are a Bahraini if you have a Bahraini passport.

    Emotionally and culturally, if you are accepted by the community. The only way you can be accepted as such is to feel for them and share their ups and downs and people know that you are genuine and care for and about their issues.

    And it doesn’t matter – to me at least – what colour, sex, orientation, background, religion, or any other demarcating line which others use to define a human being.

    I know a lot of people who have been in Bahrain for some time and deserve the passport. I regard them as Bahraini regardless of them having one.

    There are a lot more who do have that little red book that I wouldn’t give the light of day and could never regard them as Bahraini.

    Above all, on a personal level, if you feel and care for this land and its people and do not have any sectarian glasses, then you are Bahraini. Regardless of whatever else others say.

    Wagdoody will never be one of us.

  8. Lee Ann says:

    m.noor

    From my reading of arab history…a head covering has always been part of arab dress simply because the desert temps, burning sun, and dust storms make it a useful sunscreen etc.

    I have been in Bahrain for 20 years… raised 5 kids who are considered Bahraini…but my heart belongs to my country still….people have urged me to get a Bahraini passport numerous times….but Im quite happy to keep my own.

  9. bahrainiac says:

    Nawaf – what you said not only makes you “Bahraini” but a true patriot for the country. I heard a saying the other day at a Remeberance Day gathering which takes what you said a step further:

    A war-veteran is a person that at one point in their life wrote their country a blank check, “for up to including my life”.

    Those words ring true.

  10. Anonymous says:

    eating grave sand — BD0.000
    praying on a lump of sand — BD 0.000
    cursing the prophets folowers — BD 0.000
    watching girls and eating free food on muharam — BD 0.000

    PRICELESCCCSSSSS !!!!! 😀

    all for free wtf? 😀 loololololol
    gwj@hotmail.com

  11. mahmood says:

    If a person is known from the company he keeps, then our Anonymous coward with a probably bogus email of gwj@hotmail.com proves the point to a T. The only friends Wagdi has are sectarian bottom of the barrel cretins like the one mentioned here.

  12. Anonny says:

    In 1990, a lot of expats stayed in August and were prepared to dig in and face the Iraqis coming over the Causeway, the receptionist at the British Club was even overheard to say
    ” unless a member signs them in they are not coming in here…” and I am sure that would have been the case.

    I was one of those! As long as I had my
    job to do, no way was I prepared to leave.
    I think it was a stupid decision, but I
    would have happily risked my life if I
    thought Bahrain would have benefited from
    it. I’m older and a lot more cynical now,
    but hey, you never know …

  13. Anonny says:

    Above all, on a personal level, if you feel and care for this land and its people and do not have any sectarian glasses, then you are Bahraini. Regardless of whatever else others say.

    Well done, very funny. Your mother must
    be very proud. Your reward is to go to
    your nearest maatam, put the water hose
    up your bum and turn on the water until
    all the caca bubbles out of your mouth.

    Oh, that’s what you were doing already?
    Sorry.

  14. Anonny says:

    I really have to get used to this block-
    quote thingy 😛 😛 😛

    eating grave sand — BD0.000
    praying on a lump of sand — BD 0.000
    cursing the prophets folowers — BD 0.000
    watching girls and eating free food on muharam — BD 0.000

    PRICELESCCCSSSSS !!!!!

    all for free wtf? loololololol

    Well done, very funny. Your mother must
    be very proud. Your reward is to go to
    your nearest maatam, put the water hose
    up your bum and turn on the water until
    all the caca bubbles out of your mouth.

    Oh, that’s what you were doing already?
    Sorry.

  15. mahmood says:

    Alrighty then. Explain what was so wrong with that quote if you don’t mind.

  16. Anonny says:

    Umm, my mistake, Twas my intention to be rude
    to the anonymous loser who posted that
    sectarian pig-shit. Please see correction
    above. All will be made clear.

    You see the problem? I try to be cheap,
    rude and trashy and it goes awry. If
    I continue to be my nice polite everyday
    self I’m sure things will work out better
    for me. It’s just that I get so bored
    with being nice, intelligent, forbearing,
    considerate, thoughtful, warm, sympathetic
    and basically a wonderful human being ;^)

  17. Lee Ann says:

    I think cheap, rude and trashy got to come natural
    if you want it to be effective 😆

  18. mahmood says:

    I thought it was a typo! 😎

  19. Anonny says:

    Sorry!

  20. Barry says:

    Anonymous: There’s a song about you. It’s called “Everybody knows that You’re Insane”.

    Go look it up, it’s by Queens of The Stone Age. I’m sure you’ll find it fitting, dude.

    🙄

  21. underthedatetree says:

    ..one who would gladly give his life for this country

    For that you would need to be a BDF soldier – in which case you would most certainly NOT be a Bahraini. 🙄

    you are a Bahraini if you have a Bahraini passport.

    Is your passport the most authoritative document to prove one’s nationality? I think not.

  22. mahmood says:

    Technically, of course a passport is the authoritative legal document which proves one’s nationality.

    Emotionally, culturally and all other subjective criteria can and do weigh in a lot more of course, but all of those are essentially emotive subjects which will not and cannot stand in a court of law or when one presents that document and demands a citizen’s right to national services.

  23. Ali says:

    It’s now official that the ‘PRICELESS’ is on his way out of the Country 🙂

    صدرت الأوامر للشيخ وجدي غنيم بمغادرة البحرين

    The annoying thing is that it might take him long to be accepted by another Country. We need your help guys.. Any suggested destinastion?!

  24. mahmood says:

    Venice Beach, CA?

    He could wear orange and carry a drum and start another useful career for himself?

  25. Abbas says:

    I just wish that the government stop fooling around and distributing bahraini nationality to everyone…

  26. Bilbu says:

    “I just wish that the government stop fooling around and distributing bahraini nationality to everyone…”

    “A war-veteran is a person that at one point in their life wrote their country a blank check, “for up to including my life”.”

    “Thinking that BD 21.500 would make you a Bahraini… PRICELESS!”

    The guiding light of civilisation is tolerance of the other person’s point of view. Accepting that all of us may be wrong. That the other person may be right.

    We therefore have to avoid all forms of comment that imply we know more than our neighbour.

    1. You make yourself the judge
    2. You advance the hypothesis that giving your life for your country is a proof of your nationality. It may be. Or is it madness?
    3. You deride people who dress correctly. This implys that you are in a position to judge them. Are you?

    Peace

  27. mahmood says:

    True enough, but one needs to recognise and differentiate between situations in order to arrive at the truth.

  28. Ahmed says:

    Having lived and worked abroad, and being away from my beloved Bahrain, I can tell you this. No matter how long I live away, Bahrain is the only place I would call home. In fact, now that I am away nothing can compare to the sense of pride that I have about being a Bahraini. I also do not care how many or how little people share the pride of being Bahraini, or whether they feel proud or not. Everyone is free to his own opinion.

    But I always think of those foreigners who have settled and lived in Bahrain, and I ask, do they feel the same way too, even though they have now become citizens of our country, and holding the Bahraini passport? Or do they yearn to go back, or would they go back, to where they were originally from if they had the chance?

    I mean, I can still remember Bahrain versus Iran, where people were rooting for Iran, even though they were Bahrainis for two or three generations. I felt bad, these guys were my friends, why would they cheer against me and the country that has for so long allowed them to call it home?

    Everyone is most welcome here, and they have always been, the rules for citizenship are not as linear as one would hope it to be, but atleast it gives all who wish an opportunity (some what limited) to make this place better. Yet, I wonder do we have the resources or the capacity to fulfill their dreams through our own objectives?

    That’s an economic and social issue, which I believe, will never be solved.

  29. unkown says:

    Hi everyone,
    Explain this then, I am bore in Bahrain my mom is a Bahraini (My dad is from Qatar and he got Divorce for my mom before I was born and till this day I didn’t see him), I am in Bahrain for the past 23 Years finished my schooling in a private school, done my BS study’s, working in one of the biggest company in Bahrain and guess what I don’t have a passport wanna know why coz of my name (or in other words coz I am shia). Now that’s Priceless…. What kind of love should I give more to this country after all the things I am facing without a passport…one other thing I don’t ever have a CPR 😥

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