MPs banning alcohol? Not a chance!

MPs demand total ban on alcohol in Bahrain

MPs yesterday unanimously demanded a total ban on alcohol in Bahrain. They voted in favour of a parliament-proposed law banning the import, possession, sale or production of alcohol. But to become law, the proposal would have to be accepted by the government and the Shura Council.

MPs said the current law, initiated in 1956, allowing the import, possession, sale and production of alcohol under government supervision was unconstitutional and should be scrapped.

There is really no reason to panic. Trouncing on personal freedoms is nothing new for this parliament, the one whose job is ironically to do the impossible to protect them. Nor should we expect them even to read the crystal-clear constitution which specifically says:

The religion of the State is Islam. The Islamic Shari’a is a principal source for legislation. The official language is Arabic.

Which means that the Islamic Shari’a is not the exclusive source of legislation – thank God. Because had it been, then those bozos would have knocked us back to the stone ages already, and would have had no qualms about doing so. Their motivation of course is to earn those promised brownie points to tool those promised waiting nymphs in heaven, even at the expense of making hell seem like a better place than the life they want to design for us on Earth.

I’m not sure if I should be thankful for the Shura Council being there which a lot of people regard as the safety valve which would stop such idiotic schemes; I actually wish that it wasn’t there so that these morons would carry on with their schemes so much that people will have to actually rise up against them and kick their hairy butts out of office.

But as we do have the Shura Council whether we like it or not, and I am a bit busy this morning, let me end this quick piece by inviting those 40 morons to kiss my hairy padouka for all I care about them trying to rob what little personal freedoms we do have.

But in the case that they do – for some completely inexplicable reason – get their way and the government does ban alcohol, I will start distilling some good hooch myself and will make it available free to whomever wants, just to spite both!

121 thoughts on “MPs banning alcohol? Not a chance!”

  1. Sh*t i have to start having stocks, maybe it will be usefull and i will make a fortune in the black market. :)

  2. I wonder why did they impose such a law? Is alcohol consumption such a problem for Bahraini people? Does this law deal with any type of alcohol or only with ethanol? It would be hillarious to ban alcohol in medicine…

  3. Is alcohol consumption such a problem for Bahraini people?

    Not at all. We do not have a drink problem in Bahrain. We’ve no ‘booze culture’ and drink related accidents & crimes are minuscule.

    Mahmood,

    It’s great that you bring our attention back to the wordings of our national constitution. The constitution seems to never be referred to in politics here. Allot of the ridiculous proposals by our MPs could in fact be challenged and deemed unconstitutional if we refer back to our constitution! Heck, that’s why we even have a constitutional court!

  4. يخرب بيت هالبرلمان …. يعني خلاص خلصت كل المشاكل و ما بقت الا هالمشكلة؟؟؟؟؟؟؟ وينهم عن غلاء الاسعار و ازمة الاسكان و البطالة و التجنيس و المشاكل الثانية و لا بس خلاص اعيزو؟ عندي شور …. خل الحكومة تصك مجلس النواب و تخلي مجلس الشورى بس… المصاريف شوي تخف…. و ثاني شي على الاقل مجلس الشورى ما يطلع لنا بقوانين دايخة و اعضائه شايفين خير مب مثل النواب اللي ميتين على المعاشات التقاعدية و الجوازات الخضر …. و حجتهم ان احنا استقلنا من وظايفنا و قطعنا ارزاقنا بس علشان خدمة الوطن …. و الله محد جبركم و غصبكم و انتو صج بتخدمون الوطن اذا قعدتو فبيوتكم و فكيتونا و خففتو مصاريف على الحكومة …. شكلي طولتها بس من حر ما فيني

  5. So if they actually pull this one out WHAT AM I to do ?
    :cry:

    So if there is no alcohol to breath out what am I to do ?

    never mind

    these people should really think of joining the circus.

    SICK SO SICK OF THEM.

  6. drink related accidents & crimes are minuscule.

    According to traffic.gov.bh, an average of 79 drivers are caught each month due to drinking and driving. However it is not mentioned whether or not they were in an accident or not. Yet that means that each day at least 2 drivers are driving under the influence of alcohol.

    http://www.traffic.gov.bh/Offence_2007.asp

  7. Only people who drink will be upset about such a law being passed.

    Is Mahmood one of them I wonder? :roll:

  8. Yes Mahmood is one of them.

    But you should be more concerned about them robbing us for personal freedom.. oh never mind, I know that is not very important to you as your mind is already been preprogrammed and yours alone is the correct way.

  9. According to traffic.gov.bh, an average of 79 drivers are caught each month due to drinking and driving.

    Drinking and driving should never be condoned. And I am all for a “zero tolerance” approach to drinking and driving.

    As to the number of people being “caught” every month, how they do that is NOT due to them having accidents in most cases, but due to the unconstitutional trapping techniques that the police use. They customarily put a round label on the car either on the windshield, the bumper or somewhere else that they prearrange on all cars visiting a bar, restaurant serving alcohol or disco and then simply wait for them down the road and stop them, breathalise them and book them.

    At BD500 a pop, it’s a good business and a very good way to pay for their salaries. Completely unethical, but like our dear friend Salman above, who the hell cares?

  10. The dire straits this parliment and government led us to are the only reason we drink in Bahrain. Drinking, for many, is the last straw. Its not even funny anymore.

  11. Emigration is the key! Someone should do a study on the number of Bahrainis living and working abroad due to the patheticness of the little island….

  12. this law can never pass because as someone mentioned jokingly before “Where would all the saudi’s go” Joke aside, tourism in Bahrain be it through saudi people or others is big and alot of people/companies/insitutions depend on it, and banning alcohol would really affect them and decrease the number of toursits coming here (i know toursits don’t come just for the alcohol but it is one of the elements in the mix that drive people to choose a country)

    Further more what concerns me is that all this economical development in the country is largely based on Bahrain’s reputation as being a free, liberal and open country. What would happen if those MPs have their way with things the country wont be so open anymore and all those people willing to put their money in the various projects will pull out and then what … Yes as alot of people mentioned Bahrain wills lip back into the Dark Ages!!

    Give people the right to decide for themselves, if that is something they want to do, they will do it whether it is allowed or not (Biggest example of this is Kuwait and Saudi Arabia – some of the biggest consumers of alcohol in the region)

  13. I know my American ass would be on the next plane out, and many of my expatriate friends would be right behind me. There are plenty of other ‘oil countries’ around here WITH booze that pay as well or better than Bahrain. Mahmood’s right, these guys are taking your country (which is one of the few progressive Muslim states) back to the equivalent of Iran or Saudi. Both of which I, nor anyone I know, would take their expatriate talent to. If this became law, you’d see a massive exodus of people, I assure you that.

  14. Yeah yeah, hide behind your “robbing us of our personal freedom” crap.

  15. For the love of everything that is beautiful, I demand my freedom to DRINK.

    I don’t care what a some weirdos say about drinking, but I need it, and regarding drunk driving, who is stupid enough to drink and drive at the same time?

    I need My alcohol!

  16. WHAT WAS THAT!! OH NO! They’re not going to ban alcohol are they? That’s terrible news. Where am I going to get my daily supply of…oh wait a second, I don’t drink alcohol…much like the overwhelming majority of the people in this country. The only ones who do are oversized self-haters, good-for-nothing saudis and those arrogant expats (some, not all; I’m not a fascist) who you see walking around with a smirk on their face that says

    “yeah, look at me motha f****s, I make three times as much as you, have a 7-series, have a villa 10 times the size of your flat, have medical insurance, get a hefty social allowance every month…I don’t have to pay for my kids’ education, I don’t have to worry about mortgages, plus I can get up and leave this ****hole whenever I realize that I’ve sucked the well dry”

    Your post is so one-dimensional and idiotic that I don’t know where to begin. To claim that the backwardness of moral law is balanced by the beauty of liberalism is quite possibly the most stupid thing ever said…ever.

    You should get a medal for that, or better yet a Krispy Kreme donut.

  17. Aw, did I hurt you? I’m so sorry. But listen, I still will defend YOUR personal freedom even with that “non-prejudicial” outburst of yours.

    And I’ll accept both, the medal and the Krispy Kreme, thanks very much for your generosity.

  18. @ I’m in (i think you meant an) idiot (and yes you are…)

    I don’t know if that was directed at me (since I’m the only one that mentioned expats) but I assume it was. That being said…

    1. I love Krispy Kreme. And McDonalds, and KFC, and Subway, and Burger King, and all of the other fast-food American restaurants that my fellow countrymen have brought to your self-proclaimed ****hole. So if you have some KK donuts, I’ll take ‘em.

    2. I am here, in your country, to educate your children. I presume that is because it is because your fellow Bahrainis want their children to learn English from a native speaker. And might I add that I could NOT afford the tuition of the school that I teach at if I had children–which, by assumption, means that the Bahraini children I teach are better off than myself. Do I make more than the locals at the school? Absolutely. I have better qualifications. Do I drive a 7-series? Hell no. I drive a Renault Clio. So before you generalize, get your facts strait, buddy.

    Do I walk around with a smirk on my face? On occasion. Actually, quite a bit. I smirk when I see the utter stupidity displayed in the papers on a daily basis. I smirk when I see stupidity on the street–your “laborers” crammed into trucks like cattle, parents driving with children on laps, people throwing trash out the car window, etc etc etc. I smile, because the people responsible for these acts would be thrown in my jail in any western country. It just reminds me why the rest of the world think of your country as “developing.” I’m not saying that forward-thinking Bahranis don’t exist–Mahmood is a clear example of one–but half of you (including the majority of your MP’s) are one generation removed from the desert.

    Smirking and dreaming of a Krispy Kreme donut,

    B.

  19. At Bahraini No. 7

    According to traffic.gov.bh, an average of 79 drivers are caught each month due to drinking and driving.

    That isn’t the issue here. That is not THE issue why Bahrain’s bearded wonders are pushing for a complete alcohol ban. The proposal is based on their PERSONAL religious beliefs alone which I do not subscribe to as I exercise my constitutional rights to freely choose my own faith. Here is what I’d like to know.

    Is the issue of alcohol importation,possession, consumption etc a MAJOR issue for the constituents in every area of bahrain which our MPs represent?

  20. Im not much into alcohol…but I feel that if alcohol was going to be banned in Bahrain..they should have started that way from the beginning. Its like you suckered in all these investors and tourists etc with claims of an open society and a little more progressive then our neighbors…then soon as everyone gets here and unpacks…you get down to the business of “turning Bahrain into an “Islamic” country”…havent you been making that claim all along..sounded pretty hypocritical then…even more so now.

    People dont need alcohol thats for sure…but I have a feeling events similar to Prohibition in the states might actually happen here to some degree…eventually people just had enough of being told what they can and cant do…whether it be who they take to bed…what they put in their mouths…or whether or not they can worship the “god” of their choosing openly and safely. To say things are getting interesting around here is an understatement.

  21. Here is a thought . Saudi Arabia will allow drinking on the same day Bahrain bans it.
    Weekends in Dammam anyone????

  22. Wow. I very much admire your tolerance of the idiotic rants of brainwashed idiots here, Mahmood.

    So typical of the crowds miss-programmed and miss-informed to blame the “expats” for their problems. If you do not want to drink, then don’t. Let other people make their own choices! Unless you are weak willed and full of bs, in which case you are hypocritical about your own beliefs.

    Did any one even consider the negative socio-economic consequences of this nonsense.

    1. This will kill our tourism industry, on which many people, some ordinary Bahrainis, some rich, some religious and others not, depend, directly and indirectly, for a living to feed their families and etc.

    2. All my “western” friends have always thought of Bahrain as the best place to in the gulf, simple, modest people who respect others freedom. So, not only will some foreign investment leave but all our competitive industries depending on highly skilled workers would struggle to succeed in an ever more globalized world. In addition to that, our image will be harmed. And then all bahrainis will be equal…ly poor. idiot.

    3. Two words.. BLACK MARKET. enforcement. problems. costs. etc.

    Finally, I hate the hypocrisy! How can one dare criticize the treatments of arabs/ muslims in western countries if you’re demanding to deny non-muslims in bahrain their freedoms.

  23. Oh yeah, they were also talking about tighter censorship on internet pornography.
    say goodbye to sites like essex.com expertsexchange.com
    Gotta love this parliament!

  24. @Mahmood

    As to the number of people being “caught” every month, how they do that is NOT due to them having accidents in most cases, but due to the unconstitutional trapping techniques that the police use. They customarily put a round label on the car either on the windshield, the bumper or somewhere else that they prearrange on all cars visiting a bar, restaurant serving alcohol or disco and then simply wait for them down the road and stop them, breathalise them and book them.

    Yes of course, all the check points that the traffic police setup are around the bars and places that serve alcohol, there are none in other towns or cities, or side roads or even while exiting or entering a highway. I really don’t know where you came up with that idea, apparently the only check point you’ve seen is is around exhibition road.

    However let’s assume that they actually do that, why is that even wrong? Why is it unconstitutional? Assuming they actually do this, aren’t they preventing possible accidents by doing so? Aren’t the people who drink are not supposed to even drive? By actually going and driving they are risking other people’s lives and the traffic police has EVERY right to do its duty and protect the citizens of Bahrain. Are you telling me that they are doing a mistake by preventing potential accidents? Why is this wrong and yet it is ok for them to place speed radars on the highway, aren’t they

    @Sam

    That isn’t the issue here. That is not THE issue why Bahrain’s bearded wonders are pushing for a complete alcohol ban.

    I know that the issue here is based on religious law, and the reason I brought that issue up because #2 asked if there is a problem with alcohol in Bahrain, and if you think that at least 2 people every day drive under the influence of alcohol isn’t a problem (and that’s only the people who are caught) then you shouldn’t even participate in this discussion as you don’t seem to notice the potential danger these drunk drivers have on the lives of others.

    The proposal is based on their PERSONAL religious beliefs

    And it is not based on it’s personal belief, it is based on the religion adopted by this country which is Islam.

    which I do not subscribe to as I exercise my constitutional rights to freely choose my own faith.

    Yes everyone can choose his own faith, you can exercise your beloved constitutional rights freely by choosing your own faith however you have to abide by the country’s rules, if they actually approve that law, which I really doubt would happen and that’s another story, you wouldn’t be allowed to drink anymore over here, not because it’s a rule from the Islamic Sharia, but because it’s a rule set by the Kingdom of Bahrain. It won’t matter whether it was derived from Islamic Sharia, it won’t matter if you subscribed to this religion or not, you would have to abide with this country’s law. Period.

  25. why is that even wrong? Why is it unconstitutional?

    here you go:

    Article 19 [Personal Freedom]

    a. Personal freedom is guaranteed under the law.

    b. A person cannot be arrested, detained , imprisoned or searched, or his place of residence specified or his freedom of residence or movement restricted, except under the provisions of the law and under judicial supervision.

    c. A person cannot be detained or imprisoned in locations other than those designated in the prison regulations covered by health and social care and subject to control by the judicial authority.

    d. No person shall be subjected to physical or mental torture, or inducement, or undignified treatment, and the penalty for so doing shall be specified by law. Any statement or confession proved to have been made under torture, inducement, or such treatment, or the threat thereof, shall be null and void.
    Article 20 [Criminal Trials]

    a. There shall be no crime and no punishment except under a law, and punishment only for acts committed subsequent to the effective date of the law providing for the same.

    b. Punishment is personal.

    c. An accused person is innocent until proved guilty in a legal trial in which he is assured of the necessary guarantees to exercise the right of defence at all stages of the investigation and trial in accordance with the law.

    d. It is forbidden to harm an accused person physically or mentally.

    e. Every person accused of an offence must have a lawyer to defend him with his consent.

    f. The right to litigate is guaranteed under the law.

    Want more? Go here and read the constitution for yourself.

    Want even more that demonstrates that what the police are doing flies against human rights and personal freedoms?

    Have a look at this:

    Entrapment is the act of a law enforcement agent in inducing a person to commit an offence which the person would not have, or was unlikely to have, otherwise committed.

    Now consider this: put yourself in a hypothetical situation where you are faced with any of the above, will you be comfortable?

  26. @ bahraini…

    Listen. Prior to the discovery of oil, this country was unheard of (and that includes most of the gulf region.) Bahrain and neighbors essentially lived in the dark ages–quite literally. I was in Dubai the other week and was told that they didn’t have electricity until the 60’s. Your country (and others in the region)since then has thrived off of the profits of what is in the ground, simply because of supply and demand and your geographic location. Imagine if all you had to sell the world was sand :shock: Some in Bahrain have had enough forward thinking to realize that some day the use of fossil fuels will come to an end and thus have diversified monetary interests into other sectors, most notably banking.

    The problem is this–a snowball effect happens when you begin to take away freedoms for the sake of ‘religion.’ Do you really think the US gives a shit about Saudi? Once that oil is gone (or another fuel alternative is implemented and mainstreamed) Saudi is bye bye to the western world (and western money.) We (meaning the western world) only put up with the religious fundamentalism because we have something to gain. Everyone knows that. Assuming Bahrain continues to slide down the personal freedom scale and arrives at Saudi’s level, the same thing will happen. Bahrain will feel an immediate impact from the loss of tourism from the GCC, and you can kiss the $$ from westerners goodbye. And as soon as the fossil fuel boom is over, you’ll be back to that third world country you once were. The modern world dictates that religion is a choice, not something to be imposed on someone. I hate the fact that I have to follow your Ramadan rules even though I’m not a Muslim. If Bahrain continues to shove your religious ideals down the throats of non-Muslims (who, like myself, were INVITED to your country), mark my words–you will end up back where you were 80 years ago. It’s only a matter of time.

    Now, on the other hand, if Bahrain goes the opposite way you will see a country that is welcoming to all, prosperous, and a tourist destination. To me, it looks like some attitudes have to change for that to happen–yours included.

  27. Given that I’m callous enough to proudly proclaim to the whole world that I’m an idiot, my guess is that I’m probably not vulnerable to your half-broken slings and arrows, so just give the whole I’m-too-cool-to-care-about-opposing-but-usually-sounder-views thing a rest. It’s getting old.

    @21, Byron is it? Take it easy f***-face, I might be a Kenyan adopted by Madonna for all you know. I started reading the first comment and then my ADD kicked in so, no, I didn’t see your post nor was my rhetoric targeted towards you; yours seems to have kicked in shortly after reading mine.

    I’m going to skip my initial plan, which was to write a witty, slightly funny reply with a touch of satire and a pinch of aggressiveness, and just settle for the following because there’s something important you need to get through your head, and it’s better that you hear it from me than from a wise Budhist monk 40 years from now:

    Firstly, how about not putting words in my mouth. If you’re an expat with the aforementioned smirk, and satisfy the criteria I outlined, then yes: I’m Anakin and you’re Darth Vader. If not, then thank you for being here, thank you for teaching our kids, thank you for deciding to live away from your friends and family for something that you strongly believe in. Thank you for making Bahrain a more cosmopolitan place. Love love, kisses kisses and all that s***. I’m serious, from all my heart: Thank You.

    Secondly, and listen to this extra carefully. If you’re afraid that it’s nothing but the biased opinion of some stupid schmuck, write it down on a piece of paper and read it a week from now. I’ll even put it on a separate paragraph for you:

    —>
    Do not be so stupid as to equate liberalism with forward-thinkingness.
    <—

    That is simplifying things way too much and slightly arrogant because it is assuming that your social scale is the norm and anything that deviates from it is backward, with proportional amounts.

    By your, and the oversized self-hater’s whom you so proudly idolize, logic, all I’d have to do to be a forward thinker in the middle east is knock back on the praying, shave the beard, talk with a Western accent, marry a blue-eyed chick, and replace all my Pepsi cans with Heinekens.

    If I do all that then I’m a true, 100% forward-thinker. If I do only half of that then I’m only 50% of a forward thinker. Damn!

    Forward-thinkingness doesn’t mean compromise and it certainly doesn’t mean making the most number of people happy.

    You have to get it through your head that just like countries in Europe and elsewhere have laws that enforce morality so do countries in this part of the world. Just because RELATIVE to your morals they seem a bit extreme doesn’t mean that they’re backward. Some of them are, God knows that some of them are, but to generalize as people like your krispy-creme-loving idol like to do is bordering on arrogance.

    P.S. No need to embarrass yourself by telling the whole world that you drive that sad French excuse of a car.

    P.P.S. No need to add insult to injury by pointing to KFC, Burger King and Subway as your most prized exports to this part of the world. Give us a Hadron Collider, give us a Cray-2 Supercomputer, give us any of those other wonderful things your countrymen have produced, but for God’s sake stop plugging our kids’ arteries with trans-fats!

  28. As a self-proclaimed defender of our personal liberties, you sure don’t seem to have the professionalism and tolerance required of such:

    “Their motivation of course is to earn those promised brownie points to tool those promised waiting nymphs in heaven, even at the expense of making hell seem like a better place than the life they want to design for us on Earth.”

    besides your little rant there laced with bigotry,(and umm is that a tee bit of
    ignorance?!) you seem to have some peculiar notions on personal freedom. The freedoms of a people of any given country are based first and formost on what the people themselves consider freedoms,based on cultural and ideological formations.
    This also fits in with contemporary notions of “democracy” where the will of the people come first.
    For example, general marijuana use in the States is prohibited, while in Amsterdam it is not. Is the USA infringing on my rights while im there as they are prohibiting me from smoking up? No,because the representatives of the majority have seen that it is not congruent with the country’s beliefs and attitudes towards these types of substances, and they did what they thought was best for their country.
    Same scenario here in bahrain–just with alcohol.

    So even you put those
    “hairy padouka-kissing morons” aside, and you do a survey asking all bahrainis what they believe is right for their own country , I think you know as well as i do that the large majority of bahrainis would support the prohibition of alcohol. Meaning, if you used a “progressive, forward system of governance and tossed away the oh-so-horrible “shariah” system, you would still end up with a prohibition on alcohol, bc that is what the bahrainis want…and i think its reasonable to assume that bahrainis should have more say in their country than expats who will work here for a while then leave…

  29. Entrapment is the act of a law enforcement agent in inducing a person to commit an offence which the person would not have, or was unlikely to have, otherwise committed.

    Please tell me how are the traffic police are doing this? Are they forcing the drunk people that leave the bar to drive? Isn’t it the person’s responsibility to arrange a way for him to get from the bar or wherever the hell he is to his destination without driving under the influence of alcohol? All they’re doing (and remember this is hypothetical, as you still didn’t provide evidence for your baseless claims) is preventing potential accidents by preventing drunk drivers from actually going around Bahrain drunk and causing accidents.

    Now consider this: put yourself in a hypothetical situation where you are faced with any of the above, will you be comfortable?

    How about you consider this, let’s say a police car is on the highway patrolling. I pass by them at a speed exceeding 140 km/h even though I know that the speed limit is 100 km/h and therefore I’m breaking the law. According to you they don’t have the right to stop me, apparently its entrapment. They are just waiting for a speeder to pass by them and give him a ticket. At 30BD+ a ticket, this would be a great business wouldn’t it? No it wouldn’t. The whole idea of them being there is to prevent lunatic drivers from risking other people’s lives. Everyone has the right to drive safely, and no one is above the rules. If I drive over the speed limit then the police have every right to stop me, whether or not they’re waiting for me there or they have a speed radar placed. The same thing goes with this drink and drive. If you’re drunk, you shouldn’t drive. If you drive, you are breaking the law and at the same time you are risking other people’s lives. Whether or not they are waiting there for you is TOTALLY irrelevant. And in this case, the law enforcement agent did NOT force the person to drink, he did NOT force the person to drive his car under the influence of alcohol. And I need to clarify something, a person can break a rule whether or not he is caught, so if a person isn’t caught speeding doesn’t mean he isn’t breaking the rule. Therefore once a drunk person drives a car, no matter what the distance he drove the car for he just broke the law, and the police, even if they are anticipating such an action, have the right to apprehend him because that person broke the law.

  30. Me thinks I hurt im in idot’s feelings.

    My vision must be clouded with all the Big Macs I ate today. Sorry. They are sooo good, except for that fact that the beef is halal so it tastes a bit funny–but that’s neither here nor there. And I apologize for not extolling the virtues of other American inventions you enjoy, like the lightbulb (Thomas Edison) or the modern vehicle you drive (assembly line courtesy of Henry Ford.) I just ran with your fast food comment. Both you and I know that no one, even those that claim to boycott American goods, could survive a day without using something made/invented by Americans. My bad, dude.

    And what’s with the name calling? f***face? Come on, what are we, 15?

    Also, I appreciate the kisses and all, but that’s very European, and if there’s one thing we Americans hate it’s anything that’s not American. (Catch the sarcasm?)

    And you knock my car. Tsk tsk. In reality, I chose my Clio because it was the only new car I could find with a manual transmission. From what I gathered from the dealers all over the island, Arabs (generalizing here–feel free to call all Americans obese) are too lazy to drive a stick shift which is why I couldn’t find but one manual transmission vehicle. Hell, you guys even put an automatic into neutral at a stoplight. If that ain’t lazy, I don’t know what is.

    And, in closing, there are a few open-ended questions that I have for you.

    1. Exactly when, where and why would I see a Buddhist monk 40 years from now? Blame that on my American ignorance.

    2. You say that morals are relative? I think my small stereotypical western Britney-Spears-loving-brain kind of understands, but what I don’t understand is the correlation between personal morals (i.e. refusing to consume booze and pork)and societal morals. Why is it your responsibility (especially if you are the Kenyan adopted by Madonna person that you say you are) to force your morals to be MY morals? Because if you’re Kenyan, and I’m American, that makes us both expats, homeboy.

    And finally, 3. What’s a self-hater? I love myself. I don’t “idolize” anyone that hates themselves. Sounds rather suicidal to me…

  31. bc that is what the bahrainis want

    You assumption is flawed, I’m afraid.

    Apart from the fact that neither you nor I represent the whole of Bahrain, I doubt very much that the vision you are portraying hold the exclusive truth. As there are differences of opinion as to those who do want to ban alcohol and those who don’t, it behooves those who object to drinking alcohol not to drink it, that’s their prerogative, it is not; however, theirs to restrict those who do want to, nor is it the task of those who do drink to force it upon those who don’t. It’s all down to personal freedoms. It might be difficult to comprehend, but think a little on it.

  32. Please tell me how are the traffic police are doing this? Are they forcing the drunk people that leave the bar to drive?

    You miss the point, again.

    You (as do they) assume that anyone coming out of a bar is a drunk or has consumed alcohol. Therefore, and contrary to the constitution, they are assuming that a person is guilty first!

    Got it?

  33. Mahmood, you could continue making the point with another analogy…

    Since you have an internet connection, that allows access to porn. Since you have access to porn, the police should be allowed to check your computer at an at-will basis.

    Or from a public safety standpoint… Assume the government has the right to a registry of all who own cell phones–and since driving while talking is illegal, the police should have a right to stop at will those they know have phones to make sure they are properly secured and switched off. Many studies (and I’m not joking here) have shown talking on the phone is equivalent to or worse than driving drunk.

    That’s the same as them marking people’s cars at bars. I go to bars with my wife who doesn’t drink (and this is the truth) and I do. If my car was marked and we were subsequently stopped, I’d be pissed. She’s driving, sober, and the police stop amounts to unreasonable search and stop.

    By bahraini’s rational, the police should have the ultimate right to search us on assumption, rather than on fact.

    You know, to assume makes an Assout of u and me :shock:

  34. You miss the point, again.

    You (as do they) assume that anyone coming out of a bar is a drunk or has consumed alcohol. Therefore, and contrary to the constitution, they are assuming that a person is guilty first!

    Got it?

    Trust me I totally understand what you’re saying, yet again you miss the point. Let me say this slowly, are you still with me, or did I lose you? Let’s just hope you’re still with me.

    Now let me reiterate what I said earlier, you still didn’t provide the bases of your premises which states that the police plan this ahead of time and basically arrange the arrest of drivers. Please tell me where you got this and how you assume that all of those arrests occur right outside the bars, it doesn’t matter if you actually have a legitimate source or it was just from your wild imagination.

    Now let me explain this clearly. The law in Bahrain, and in many other countries, is that you can’t drive a vehicle while you’re under the influence of alcohol to the extent where you are mentally or physically can’t control your actions or decisions.

    Now disregarding the labeling of the car by the police, that you claim and yet to prove, the act of driving the car by an individual that is under the influence of alcohol is by itself breaking the law.

    Now going back to the labeling of the car, let us take a similar example to explain it’s their actions’ validity (even though I don’t believe they do that). Why do the police patrol the highway, let’s say, Sh. Khalifa bin Salman highway, why do they patrol that highway, and place speed radars on it rather than patrol the area from pearl roundabout to the diplomatic area? Why don’t they place speed cameras on that road? If you’re confused about the road I’m referring to it’s King Faisal highway, the one that passes by the Regency hotel, the sheraton etc. Let me tell you why they place patrol cars on Sh. Khalifa highway rather than King Faisal highway. The traffic congestion on King Faisal highway is much more compared to the one on Sh. Khalifa highway, barely anyone could even exceed 80 km/h during the day on that road. However, on Sh. Khalifa highway many drivers go over 150 km/h EASILY, and if you drive on that road on daily bases you would notice that the safety fence on the side is being refixed regularly because of the high incident of accidents, and guess what’s the main cause of those accidents? Speeding.

    So now using your amazing logic about the DUI case, if we apply it to the scenario I mentioned above then the police are committing entrapment aren’t they? NO they aren’t, they are PREVENTING possible accidents by placing patrol cars and speed radars. One who doesn’t break the law wouldn’t be stopped would he? Same applies to the DUI case. I hope you have the mental ability to comprehend what I’m saying in my second post in a row that is just emphasizing on the points discussed in the first and the dignity to admit you’re wrong (I have yet to see you admit that you were wrong in any of your posts).

  35. @Bahraini,

    you think that at least 2 people every day drive under the influence of alcohol isn’t a problem (and that’s only the people who are caught) then you shouldn’t even participate in this discussion as you don’t seem to notice the potential dange

    I have every right (as do you) to participate in the debate, so to ask me to remove myself from the floor because we disagree on certain points is uncalled for.

    As for the statistics in question – out of the 100,910 total offenses for the given time period, a mere 341 were for DUI. The numbers clearly show that DUI is NOT a major issue or contributor to the atrocious accidents and our high RTA death rates in the country.

  36. Mahmood, they simply don’t get Entrapment and they won’t get. Entrapment of those who drink is illegal; it’s like racial profiling, its discriminating drivers. Racial Profiling, I thought that was something Arabs would understand especially after 9-11. Let me give you an example, in the US patrol officers highly target African-Americans and generally ignore everyone else. Entrapment is only legal if the state posted signs around bars and other places letting people know that there are surveillance cameras around or possible law enforcement. If the general population was aware, then their more likely not to commit the crime, isn’t that the purpose for them not to commit the crime not for the police to catch them and get paid.

    What if people set up surveillance cameras and law enforcements only outside the Mosques, to catch terrorists? This one is for Bahraini, “The traffic congestion on King Faisal highway is much more compared to the one on Sh.”. Let’s use your logic and let’s assume that all terrorist acts are committed by Muslims in particularly Arabs and much more compared too …. (do you get it). Then the police is committing entrapment, justice is equality and fairness, over punishment. What if people only stopped to search and question Arabs who have long beards and scarfs on their heads, won’t Arabs claim they were being discriminated and solely targeted as terrorists. It’s illegal because it treats a certain group unfairly because of their opinion or prejudice of alcohol. You don’t treat one group worse than others.

  37. We need to heed the words of Benjamin Franklin: Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.

    We need to heed these words because whenever we overlook injustice towards one group of people and allow ourselves to make excuses for that injustice, it is only a matter of time until the injustice will also affect us.

    And, I believe that we all have to take responsibility for what is happening, because it could not happen without our participation, even if that participation is “only” a matter not being informed or getting involved to defend the Constitution.

    by: Sheila Musaji “The Chickens Come Home to Roost – Losing our Civil Rights”

  38. @ i’m an idiot

    WHAT WAS THAT!! OH NO! They’re not going to ban alcohol are they? That’s terrible news. Where am I going to get my daily supply of…oh wait a second, I don’t drink alcohol…much like the overwhelming majority of the people in this country.

    “The real question that we need to address is should we let a majority determine what one believes, wears or eats? Can the Majority in the United States do that? Can the majority in Indonesia do that? Should that work in India? Can the Sunni Majority in Saudi Arabia harass the Shia? Can the Shia Majority in Iran harass the Sunnis? We have to catch up with our own integrity. Those who were a majority elsewhere are a minority somewhere else.

    A majority of Muslims understand that Islam is a religion of peace, a religion of freedom and justice, and a religion that does not force people to behave.”

    By: Mike Ghouse “Ahmadiyya’s and the role of the Majority”

    R-E-S-P-E-C-T!!!!! If the majority of people do not drink why does it bother them? Do minorities have rights in Bahrain? Do you think it is wise to amend the constitution so easily? Developing countries always change their constitution; this creates political instability which creates economic instability which creates social problems. Why is alcohol a major problem that it might require the constitution to be amended? Is it the religion/morality of the people? Ask yourself, is Islam a religion that forces people to behave? The answer lies in Education/Awareness not brute force. :idea:

  39. Nothing like an ice cold Amstel Light after a long hard working day! Nothing beat the sweet taste of the golden Desert wine. But I can not but feel guilty every time a take sip. O not because of any religious or cultural reason. Far from that. It is because of the terrible damage that these drinks do to the human body and to human societies.

    Look around you and will see how much damage there is because of these beautiful but evil drinks. Google crime and alcohol and you will see that a large proportion of violent crime is because of the abuse of alcohol.

    In spite of my love for it I must but admit that alcohol like tobacco is a curse on humanity. I would not support a total ban of course, but surely making it less accessible i.e. more costly can only be good. Read any newspaper in London, New York or Sydney and there is a good chance that you will read of a police officer or an A&E doctor complaining that alcohol beverages have become too cheap that they are a real menace to people now.

    I call on all governments to multiply their taxes on alcohol.

  40. bahraini:

    you still didn’t provide the bases of your premises which states that the police plan this ahead of time and basically arrange the arrest of drivers.

    You seem to be in shock that our police transgress the law (and ethics)! I wish I had your blind trust, it must be nice living in a cocoon.

    Okay then, don’t take my word for it. Go and ask someone else, or just walk to any establishment that serves alcohol and ask the security guards (who themselves participate in this practice by the way, and yes, I have seen that myself).

    if we apply it to the scenario I mentioned above then the police are committing entrapment aren’t they?

    Nope, your logic is severely flawed. They would only stop those who have already broken the law by speeding over the published and sign-posted limits. Not every car that looks fast to them just in case it might speed.

    Capiche?

  41. Sorry.. not into arguments.. my points quickly if you may.. “just wanted them out of my chest..

    1. We’re better off without it but I do respect the freedom of others and I have no problem with alcohol or bars in the country.

    alcohol because of freedom: yes
    alcohol because of islamic shari’a is aprincipal source for legislation but not the exclusive: this is a complete bull…

    u know how things go here. no one will pass this red line in bahrain. not in a zillion years. they’re gonna keep coming back again and again because of the shari’a.

    2. THERE IS A CHANCE but in the future>> This (government + parliment) won’t pass it but in the coming years, it will. Look at Kuwait for example and don’t forget our (hotel-prostitution idustry) when everyone said Bahrain could’nt live without this “the business is nearly out and new idustrial and commercial projects came into business and making money”

    3. Police don’t arrest drivers coming out from a bar, they arrest drivers who either they think they are drunk or being told they are drunk. A lot of them know a person is drunk but they allow him/her to pass. It’s only when there is a serious violation of the driving law where ppl are caught.

    Trust me, I’ve seen it by myself and i know it from the police themselves.

    4. PLEASE guys we don’t need a very huge discussion on the issue when all of us know the answers..

    PS: by the way Mahmood, your blog looks like an extension of Parliament. “MPs rejected” if you may call it. It’s all about Parliment and discussing AND (focusing) on the same silly topics.

    Sorry for writing too much

    Cheers mate..

  42. Most Western Expats are addicted to alchohol without realising it. If you need a drink when you come home form work and have one every day plus a couple on Friday then sure you are an alchoholic.

    Before the torrent of abuse starts flowing think about it. What is the longest you have gone without a drink and why did you start again.

    I think it makes sense to ban it or at least price it out of the market.

    If we put everything else right with this place then we wouldn’t need tourism.

  43. Why is alcohol a major problem that it might require the constitution to be amended?

    It isn’t!!! That’s what I’ve been saying all along. Our parliment are proposing the ban on alcohol based on RELIGIOUS grounds! This has not come about because we have drunken disorderly behavior, drink driving problems, or massive alcohol abuse.

    The negative impact such a ban would have on the country and it’s economy and it’s reputation far out numbers any good you may see coming out of this.. Actually now I come to think of it? what GOOD would a total ban on alcohol bring?

  44. Most Western Expats are addicted to alchohol without realising it. If you need a drink when you come home form work and have one every day plus a couple on Friday then sure you are an alchoholic.

    What a load of absolute RUBBISH! Who are you to brand MOST westerners as alcoholics? Go pickup a medical journal and read how alcoholism is defined by the medical profession! There is nothing wrong with unwinding after a long hard days work with a glass of wine or a pint!! Those who drink to excess continuously on a daily basis which negatively affects their health, well-being, and their social lives DO indeed have an addiction problem & would need help – and MOST expat westerners have such lifestyles here you say? Alcoholism is a form of addiction, just like being hooked on coffee, smoking, or continuously indulging yourself with food etc.

    Would it be fair for me to call MOST locals as unhealthy and morbidly obese because they cant help but eat buckets of white rice after they get home from work everyday???

  45. Just an aside. If the government cleaned up the taxi service there would be little incentive for anyone to drink and drive. The thieves masquerading as taxi drivers are driving people to drink and drive . . . literally !

  46. I absolutely agree with you. I can’t count how many times that the for-hire crooks (I mean taxi drivers) have attempted to charge me 5 dinars for a ride from JJ’s in Adliya to Juffair. There have been times that I’ve walked home because I refuse to pay them that. So really, I have two other options–drive myself OR use Radio taxi, the only fair (I mean metered) taxi company on the island. The problem with them is that they are always booked. If Dubai can have a decent taxi service, so can Bahrain.

  47. @ number 50 + 51,

    The waiting is almost over!! On the 23rd of April the govt announced a third taxi firm was on it’s way! Setup purely…

    to support retired and elderly taxi drivers as well as the orphans and widows of drivers, it was announced

    haha QUALITY!! :lol:

  48. you guys are drifting off topic over here. Isn’t this post supposed to be about banning alcohol?? If it is then I can assure you that for every 5 bahrainis that don’t drink you will definitely find 2 or 3 who actually do. And out of 10 bahrainis around 3 to 4 are making a living either direct indirectly off alcohol.

    I don’t really follow up with much of the musings and the bull$hit going on in the parliament but from what I know these are the same MPs who have no guts to face the real issues the country is facing such as housing and standard of living, they are the SAME people who do nothing but complain and argue like preschool children.

    If you don’t drink, good for you. If you do drink enjoy every drop of alcohol you consume, just don’t make a fool of yourself while DRUNK.

    Like the news clip mentions this is about a very old law which will NOT be repealed without any serious supporting evidence or a good business case behind it. And from the way things are it seems in Bahrain there isn’t anything to say that alcohol should be banned.

    P.S there used to be a local distillery in Naim a long time ago although I doubt it is still around but goes to show you that alcohol since the 50s has had very deep roots in Bahrain

  49. come to think of it i’m starting to think these islamists are the biggest criminals in the country right after the taxi drivers and political and business figures

  50. If they are going to start passing “religious” laws…then why dont they start with the Sharia Court…pass a law that says the court must treat victims with compassion and fairness…and punish criminals with a suitable term that discourages future crime. When pedophiles and rapists are getting a slap on the wrist and walking free…alcohol consumption hardly seems worth the bother.

  51. Welcome to Bahrainstan:

    Status: 3rd World Country

    Politics: Religious Parities in rule

    Social: SLAVES due to a lack of civil freedoms, rise of intolerance, fanaticism etc

    Economy: Free economy so far.

    Say good bye to your freedom to choose. Today the parliament votes a ban on alcohol, tomorrow the government will vote for a proposal that all women should wear the hijab (including foreign female workers). They will tell the public how to act, what to eat, what to wear, who they may socialize with etc.

    Sooner or later the religious clerics will interfere in the free economy (because they claim to know more than those who are educated in that field). Besides these religious clerics already interfere in politics, astronomy (they don’t believe in technology or investigation through it for moon sighting), medicine (they don’t have any knowledge in this field either, some of the prominent sheiks believe in blood purging for AIDS, and they will have a problem teaching your children sex education), history (they believe there isn’t any history before prophet Mohammed (pbup), no Egyptians, Phoenicians, No Greeks, and the destruction of anything that isn’t Muslim) . They believe in forced gender segregation in the university, racial segregation in other parts (I can’t wait to see intellectual terrorism, clearly the public doesn’t know any better). There’s nothing these religious clerics haven’t put their ignorant hands in, they don’t believe in expolaration and examination.

    OMG you the hell has Salafi’s in a political party! lol Its so funny this is what they have as brief description on wikipedia: “Asalah seeks to promote a hardine interpretation of Islam which rejects much of Bahrain’s modernism as well as encouraging religious observance. It has led opposition in the Kingdom to US military action in Iraq and was at the forefront of demonstrations against military action in Falluja.
    On the issue of women’s political rights, Mr Al Buaneen told the Bahrain Tribune on 18 January 2006 that the party disagrees with them having any.”

    Who cares, someone voted for these groups in parliament, lol! They’ll just have to learn the hard way. Good by Bahrain, hope you survived the storm.

  52. Wow! reading all this really makes me want to have a drink tonight! im bahraini & proud that i drink, and i know for a fact that drink will never be banned in Bahrain b’coz the top people in this country drink. besides our commerce depends on it.
    Now where’s that bottle of vodka..

  53. Regarding a blanket alchohol ban:

    – I hope not. I have a drink every week or two because it’s nice to do it occasionally.

    – a total ban will create an ugly black market as well as deterring skilled people from coming here.

    However, I can understand Bahraini parents who don’t want to drink and who don’t want to see drunken Saudis filling the roads every weekend.
    I can understand the feelings of a Bahraini wife/mother who knows that her husband/son is spending a significant proportion of his BD200 salary in bars. It would be interesting if – in the interests of true democracy :^D – a plebiscite were enacted to gauge the real opinion of the population. I think we all know what the result would be.

    As for the police policy – more power to them. To wait outside hotels is not entrapment, it’s just attending to an area where it is known that a crime is often committed. You’re innocent until tested and found guilty. If I’m breathalysed while driving away from a certain famous night spot and found to be driving while over the legal limit, then that is my own silly fault. Try pulling this shit in the UK. If this law-enforcement policy saves just one life – just one fucking life then it has justified myself in my eyes. And yes, let police cars follow Saudi weekend drivers around, that’s fine by me.

    One more thing: taxi drivers. If everybody were forced by stricter enforcement of drink-drive laws to use them, then they’d have more revenue and be less desperate – and more unhappy customers would force the issue to be resolved better.

    And to all those Saar expats who complain about Taxi fares, it’s just the equivalent of a couple of beers and you earn so much more than the rest of us – what is your problem? Just insist on the meter, then tip them for switching it on, and thank your lucky stars that your life is so much more opulent than theirs. I’ve seen a taxi driver who was beaten badly by “customers” and I’ve seen one shovelling Brit-girl vomit out of his car. We’ve got it so much better than they have – trust me.

    Anyway, for those of you who’ve been patient enough to read this far: let’s keep alchohol available, but let responsible consumption behaviours be encouraged and irresponsible consumption behaviours be more severely penalised. Also think about how bad you look when you are publicly drunk in a Muslim country – try to respect yourself and others.

    Bye for now – after work I’m going to go home, cook Italian, and enjoy a couple of glasses of a nice Aussie Shiraz. To stop me from doing this would be a crime ;^)

  54. Be careful of banning something too many people want to have. The costs of keeping something banned can far outweigh the damage they do when they are legal, whether those products are alcohol, drugs, or cigarettes. The side effects of illegality are organized crime, smuggling, street shoot-outs, even low level conflicts.

    The best way to get rid of a noxious product is to change peoples’ minds about using it. No buyers, no sellers.

  55. What I have never understood is why MPs have no interest in dealing with the huge prostitution problem here in Bahrain. I would understand the desire for an alcohol ban if they started with more damaging issues first. Surely sleeping regularly with a hooker is more damaging in terms of family and spirituality than having a drink on a Thirsday night?

  56. Prostitution isn’t going anywhere fast. I personally do not have an issue with it myself.

    Having sex is fine, paying for a service is fine, so what is it about combining the two that makes it “criminal”? As long as you have consenting adults on both sides I don’t see what the problem is. The country really cant stamp it out. It is humanly impossible.

  57. What I have never understood is why MPs have no interest in dealing with the huge prostitution problem here in Bahrain. I would understand the desire for an alcohol ban if they started with more damaging issues first. Surely sleeping regularly with a hooker is more damaging in terms of family and spirituality than having a drink on a Thursday night?

    Prostitution is not a big of a problem as many people claim it is. It’s only those married individuals who seek the services of prostitutes are the ones who are worrying others about the potential conflicts that they may cause within a family.

    If you look up prostitution on wikipedia you will realize that not only is it the 2nd oldest profession in the world its also the most deeply-rooted profession as well. There are many that claim that it has roots in our region as well. If that is true then I guess anyone with half a brain would keep their trap shut about prostitution unless they know what it does to a community.

  58. The problem is majority rule. We wanted democracy, this is its baggage. Mahmood, you refer to the Constitution. True, as it stads, it seems to protect personal freedoms including the right not to be a good muslim! But remember, this constitution was not drafted by a representative democratic Constituent Assembly. No, it is an imposed constitution. I’m afraid if we did have an elected body now to write up a constitution, its composition would probably be 99% Islamic. That constitution would ban everything non-islamic! So then even our constitution wouldn’t protect those personal liberties you talk about. I think politicians should understand and realise that a strictly islamic-state cannot survive and prosper in the 21st century. We should all adopt a “live and let live” attitude, tolerance is our only solution…

  59. We wanted democracy, this is its baggage.

    The stage that is supposedly “set” is far from democratic. Parliament has turned into a a religious gentleman’s club where the only things discussed are the religious beliefs of it’s members. Our MPs are NOT representing the issues of their constituents at a governmental level. Do you think people are queuing up at their local MP’s front door pleading for a ban on alcahol or homosexuality? Ofcourse not. The majority are finding the cost of living a struggle, the majority are in need of better public services, better schools, better healthcare!

    No, it is an imposed constitution.

    “We” as a nation had no input into the sculpting of our national constitution, however, the finished product was handed to us on a silver plate and it was accepted and voted in almost unanimously by the local population.

    Separate religion from the state and all our problems are solved! As radical as it sounds i think that alone will take us forward well beyond what any of our GCC neighbors could ever envisage!

  60. Sam,

    “Separate religion from the state and all our problems are solved!”

    I endorse that.

    Humanity has progressed so much once it has freed itself from the shackles of religion.

    Interestingly, few years ago there was a study of two small towns in a Scandinavian country that I can not remember now about the incidents of theft. They discovered that it was higher in the more religious town!!!

  61. Sam, you are right in saying that a ban on alcohol is not a priority for citizens. However, I do believe a majority of them would like to see such a ban. The majority of Bahrainis are religious, both Sinna and Shi’aa.

    You make an error of fact on your second point though, we did not vote on the constitution. We voted on the National Charter, which set the theory of the constitution.

    Seperation of religion and state would be convenient, but that would mean seperating the majority of citizens from the state. That, my friend, is something I do not wish to see. Unless the people believe in it, seperation of “mosque and state” would turn against every government.

  62. @ Yousif,

    May I remind you of a little example of a country that was founded on separation of church & state… America. It has worked (albeit with a few blips) though when the constitution was drafted the vast majority of the population were Christian (in various forms, the same as your country with the Shi’a Sunni argument).

    It can happen. And quite honestly, it SHOULD happen. I’m with Nine and Sam on that point.

    Sure, you’ll always have fundamentalists trying to change the system (i.e. right-wing Christians) but by and large the system works the way it should. That is the ONLY way to placate the masses. It is unfortunate that many in this country share Yousif’s opinion.

  63. >>
    Humanity has progressed so much once it has freed itself from the shackles of religion. Interestingly, few years ago there was a study of two small towns in a Scandinavian country that I can not remember now about the incidents of theft. They discovered that it was higher in the more religious town!!!
    >>

    You’re a very special kind of idiot aren’t you. I guess you must have skipped the lecture on implication in your logic 101 class.

    You know, funnily enough, I did a scientific study last night and discovered that the girl next door was stupid enough to think that A* search is better than Dijkstra’s algorithm in memory-critical applications; I asked her brother and he answered the question correctly.

    Therefore, based on this scientific study I would like to infer that all girls are stupid and all boys are intelligent. Q.E.D.

    How about you quit with the overcompensating. In THIS country and in THIS part of the world, religion is beautiful and it is embraced by the overwhelming majority of people. You, along with the other drunks who have posted here so far obviously have different opinions, which is fine; but stop trying to impose your convictions on a society that doesn’t give a rat’s a** about them.

  64. Well taken point, idiot *BURP!* Continue to stick your head in the sand *BURP!* and I’ll continue to consume my gin and tonic *BURP!* and we’ll agree to disagree *BURP!*

    Now where did I set that human rights report on Bahrain? *BURP!!*

    Damn, must have spilled my drink on it. Oh well, I’ll have the slaves (I mean low-paid help *BURP!*) clean it up!

  65. In THIS country and in THIS part of the world, religion is beautiful and it is embraced by the overwhelming majority of people.

    There is nothing unique about THIS country or OUR people or OUR religion to suggest that “convictions” as you call it play no role in society, politics, and governmental policies. You don’t have to read very far into our constitution to see it is simply a watered down version of one upheld in another part of the world.

    Ps I love your honest screen name!

  66. You, along with the other drunks who have posted here so far obviously have different opinions

    basically the only opinion that counts is from someone whose as religiously brainwashed as he is sober??

    I pity your way of thinking

  67. @ Byron

    I’m afraid you misunderstood me. I also support seperation of church and state, and regret that we only have one liberal in our parliament. However, I’m a strict believer in democracy as well. That means majority rule, whatever it may be. Of course there needs to be some sort of charter of freedoms, be it a Bill of Rights or some other sort of safeguard.

    We are a fledgling democracy, and people will come to understand the importance of seperation of church and state one day. Let us do it on our own pace Byron, and remember that we haven’t had a revolution like America to create such a rise against traditional thought. For now, I think the liberals in this country should make their voices heard, but in a very civilised manner without offending others.

    I hope I’m making myself clearer now…

  68. He’s an Idiot said:

    In THIS country and in THIS part of the world, religion is beautiful and it is embraced by the overwhelming majority of people.

    That’s a very romantic view of THIS country and THIS part of the world isn’t it? You (should) know that THIS country and THIS part of the world only pays lip service to religion.

    In fact, it has been amply demonstrated that religions flourish – in a practical and correct way – in a liberal society than it does in a restrictive one.

  69. Good point Mahmood. I suppose that is because in a restrictive society, one group, whomever they may represent, restricts the religion of society to what that specific group wishes it to be… and restricts entry into politics, to those that represent the manifestations of religion they wish to see.

    Whereas in a liberal society, everyone that wishes to practice what they choose, can do so, so long as it does not impede the rights of others.

    I do not understand why this is so difficult to accept. While I understand the freedoms of the majority to practice their own beliefs, I hope that they won’t impose those beliefs on myself or my family, and if they do, I anger, I agitate, and I rebel. This is a human condition, that we need to all accept, lest we seek to build forgeries of societies that represent our will and no other.

  70. I am an idiot,

    Well I may be “a special kind of an idiot” but at least, unlike you, I do not take pride in it!

  71. @70, Could you please stop assuming that every single word that I type is directed towards you? It’s obvious that you dig me, it’s just that I’m not interested. Please, you’re not my type so give it a rest.

  72. ….thank God. Because had it been, then those bozos would have knocked us back

    تصف حكم الله بأنه سوف يجعل الناس متأخرون و فوق كل هذا تجاهر بالذنب و تقول أنك تشرب الكحول. تذكر يا أخ محمود قول الحبيب المصطفى صلى الله عليه و اله و سلم . ” كل أمتى معافى إلا المجاهرون ”

    و تذكر وعيد الله سبحانه و تعالى ” يوم نقول لجهنم هل امتلأت و تقول هل من مزيد “. إتقي الله في نفسك و هدانا الله و هداك الى الدين الحنيف … و أخيرا أخي أنا لست عليك بمعلما و لكن “وذكر فإن الذكرى تنفع المؤمنين” .. و السلام عليكم

  73. You’re such an easy target, I just can’t help myself.

    I’m not the only one who agrees, look at #77. :lol:

  74. اقوووووووووول ….. حتى اذا المجلس منع الخمر للحين بنلقاه فالديرة من باب كل ممنوع مرغوب …. بدل ما يحطون دوبهم من دوب هالموضوع خلهم يجابلون المواضبع المهمة مثل ازمة الاسكان و غلاء الاسعار -عبالهم هالخمسين بتسوي شي هاذي حتى بيل الكهربه ما بتقدر تسده – و غير المصايب و البلاوي الثانية …. الا اجوفهم هالايام ساكتين على موضوع معاشاتهم التقاعدية شسالفة؟ ….. ما قلتو لي جم يوم باقي و نفتك من هالمجلس ؟

  75. Oh my God! Have mercy on us, you have opened hell doors with this subject.

    why can’t they just get it? who ever drinks let him drink, who doesn’t want to drink stay at home.

    why can’t we just enjoy our personal freedoms? (without being judged).

    The lord almighty is my judge not a human, when it comes to me drinking or practicing any of my personal freedoms.

    What is next a dress code?
    mandatory beard growing?

    why don’t they try to solve real problems?

    or at least social problems like:

    Wife beating,
    child abuse,
    or even animal abuse

    Never judge people, life is short live and let live.

  76. why don’t they try to solve real problems?

    or at least social problems like:

    Wife beating,
    child abuse,
    or even animal abuse

    Never judge people, life is short live and let live.

    Because in the mind of the Islamist all of the social problems will magically disappear once everyone is a perfect Muslim, because Allah gave Muslims the perfect book for all time and all the answers are there.

    How could there EVER be any social problems if everyone followed Allah’s law perfectly? Seriously, it’s such an easy answer to everything. Just do exactly what the Koran says – period. Follow Mohammed’s example in the Hadith, and there won’t be any problems at all ever. EVER. It’s perfect. You can’t claim it is not because Mohammed even said it was perfect. Would you ever question him? No? Didn’t think so.

    And that is why separation of church and state is important. Religious leaders and religious thought should not ever be more than guidance, not legalism. Religious legalism draws people away, pulls them apart, promotes hatred.

    The state must be independent of the church. Humans are not Gods – they are not perfect, and the state must be secular and rational, with no ‘perfect laws for all time’. There are no perfect laws for all time. Any claims to the contrary are outright lies.

    A real prophet – Jesus – once said to render to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and to God what is God’s. To the Deity goes the faith, but to the state goes the reason and the practicality. Intermixing the two will destroy both.

  77. Mahmood is the one man in the Middle East I would love to share an adult beverage with.
    What is needed for the people of Bahrain is a dose of old fashioned American individualism.

    There is a great episode of Married: With Children, where Al Bundy incites street riots
    over a proposed 2 cent beer tax.

    If this kind of idiocy ever happens in America, I have just one thing to say:

    They can have my Budweiser when they pry it from my cold dead hand!

    I’ll drink to that!

  78. What does everyone think of the notion that you automatically assume the religion of your parents from day one? We all assume that all Bahrainis are a religious, we assume that they are all Muslims and worshipers of “God” (whose existence lacks evidence of any kind I might add).

    Aren’t such assumptions flawed and doing more harm to society as a whole than it does good?

  79. Well, today, the excellent GDN reports that they’re imposing “curfew” in Juffair to deal with prostitution. Shops/restaurants will have to close at midnight, and that street won’t be accessible from midnight to 6am. Given that THAT is the ONE MAIN street in Juffiar–also that it leads to Specialist Hospital, it’s a farce.

    democracy is a pain when those elected dont have a clue. but it’s not only their fault. it’s the fault of the idiots who voted them in

  80. democracy is a pain when those elected dont have a clue. but it’s not only their fault. it’s the fault of the idiots who voted them in

    If what you are saying is true about closing the street and the curfew, then Oh My Dear God, These people are idiots.

    I agree with you there, it is not their fault, it is the fault of those who have elected them.

  81. http://www.gulf-daily-news.com/Story.asp?Article=216370&Sn=BNEW&IssueID=31045

    Boy was it refreshing to read that in the papers this morning. Finally, we’re moving away from backwardness and towards modernity; having one of our oldest villages christened “Little Las Vegas” is a deserved pat-on-the-back really.

    I mean moral law and conservatism are so 15th century. If some Levis-wearing dick-head wants to go ahead and get drunk and puke all over the sands of a 1000 year old village then I’m all for it. If some goateed good-for-nothing Bedouin from across the border wants to pick any girl that he sees walking the streets and take her to his bedroom, I say no one has the right to stop him. I mean it is the 21st century. Hell, if some father decides that he wants to rape his daughter and have six kids with her and hide her in a cellar for 20 years, I say he should go for it. That’s what modernity is all about. Screw the turban, let’s all just have a nationwide sex-fest with booze flowing through the streets and packets of LSD hanging from the trees, while making sure that there are enough semi-sober pale-faced foreigners and beige-faced, complexly ignorant sell-outs to run the show.

    Aaah…It sure feels great to see your culture being raped before your very eyes.

    >>If what you are saying is true about closing the street and the curfew, then Oh My Dear God, These people are idiots.

    Yeah, as opposed to the skinheads roaming the streets between sundown and sunrise; they’ve all got Ph.D.s from M.I.T. right?

  82. >>Well, today, the excellent GDN reports that…

    Boy was it refreshing to read that in the papers this morning. Finally, we’re moving away from backwardness and towards modernity; having one of our oldest villages christened “Little Las Vegas” is a deserved pat-on-the-back really.

    I mean moral law and conservatism are so 15th century. If some Levis-wearing dick-head wants to go ahead and get drunk and puke all over the sands of a 1000 year old village then I’m all for it. If some goateed good-for-nothing Bedouin from across the border wants to pick any girl that he sees walking the streets and take her to his bedroom, I say no one has the right to stop him. I mean it is the 21st century. Hell, if some father decides that he wants to rape his daughter and have six kids with her and hide her in a cellar for 20 years, I say he should go for it. That’s what modernity is all about. Screw the turban, let’s all just have a nationwide sex-fest with booze flowing through the streets and packets of LSD hanging from the trees, while making sure that there are enough semi-sober pale-faced foreigners and beige-faced, complexly ignorant sell-outs to run the show.

    Aaah…It sure feels great to see your culture being raped before your very eyes.

    >>If what you are saying is true about closing the street and the curfew, then Oh My Dear God, These people are idiots.

    Yeah, as opposed to the skinheads roaming the streets between sundown and sunrise; they’ve all got Ph.D.s from M.I.T. right?

  83. Yipee, I got banned…

    don’t flatter yourself, it was simply the spam filter which objected to you for some reason. Jumping to conclusions won’t serve your purpose.

    I mean moral law and conservatism are so 15th century. If some Levis-wearing dick-head wants to go ahead and get drunk and puke all over the sands of a 1000 year old village then I’m all for it. If

    Neither will gross exaggeration.

  84. تصف حكم الله بأنه سوف يجعل الناس متأخرون و فوق كل هذا تجاهر بالذنب و تقول أنك تشرب الكحول. تذكر يا أخ محمود قول الحبيب المصطفى صلى الله عليه و اله و سلم . ” كل أمتى معافى إلا المجاهرون ”

    و تذكر وعيد الله سبحانه و تعالى ” يوم نقول لجهنم هل امتلأت و تقول هل من مزيد “. إتقي الله في نفسك و هدانا الله و هداك الى الدين الحنيف … و أخيرا أخي أنا لست عليك بمعلما و لكن “وذكر فإن الذكرى تنفع المؤمنين” .. و السلام عليكم
    Fo the purpose of informing our non arabic speakers i wish to translate this from message no.79:

    “You describe the rule of God as causing people to become backward. And on top of that you publicise your sins and say that you drink alcohol. Remember brother Mahmood the saying of our beloved the chosen [Prophet Muhammad] (Peace be upon him), “My whole nation may be excused except the ones who publicise [their sins]”.

    Also remember the promise of God, the majestic the most high, who says,” the day we say to the hell fire, ‘have you been filled’, and it says, ‘are there more?’. Fear God concerning yourself and may God guide us and you to the true religion… and lastly I am not a teacher upon you but “remind as a reminder is beneficial to he believers” and peace be upon you.

  85. اقوووووووووول ….. حتى اذا المجلس منع الخمر للحين بنلقاه فالديرة من باب كل ممنوع مرغوب …. بدل ما يحطون دوبهم من دوب هالموضوع خلهم يجابلون المواضبع المهمة مثل ازمة الاسكان و غلاء الاسعار -عبالهم هالخمسين بتسوي شي هاذي حتى بيل الكهربه ما بتقدر تسده – و غير المصايب و البلاوي الثانية …. الا اجوفهم هالايام ساكتين على موضوع معاشاتهم التقاعدية شسالفة؟ ….. ما قلتو لي جم يوم باقي و نفتك من هالمجلس ؟

    Translation of message 81
    ” I say even if the parliament ban alcohol, it will still be available. For everything that is prohibited their is an attraction. Instead of focusing on this issue. They should focus on solving more important issues such as the housing crises and inflation. I hope these 50 people do this, even we can’t pay the electricity bill. That is besides the other problems. These days they are also silent on their own retirement plans. How come? You did not mention how many days are left untill we are rid of this parliament?

  86. >>Neither will gross exaggeration.

    Good God, are you actually complexly ignorant or do you only act this way to get more pageviews?

    This blog is only good for like-minders who like to pat each other on the back and smell each other’s farts.

    I’m outta here…for good.

  87. so they are now pinning on juffair but forgetting exhibition road??? :roll: :roll:

    if they want to implement such rules they ought to apply for both exhibiton road in hoora and shabab road (the infamous strip) in juffair

    Busaiteen is next people :razz:

  88. He said if the proposal was approved, the main commercial road would be cordoned off at night to prevent cars from using it and police patrols would be increased.

    IF is the big word in that sentence

    although I do know people who live in Juffair and I DO understand the torture they go through every weekend night. Makes them go crazy as well

  89. All it takes is the proper application of the law. Public drunkenness is nothing to be proud of and it could be dangerous to both the drunk and those around them. So throw them in jail and deal with them within the law.

    Same for those who harass people.

    Do this properly a couple of times and I am sure you will see quite a reduction in these incidents.

    Closing shops at a time of night in a residential neighbourhood is also important and that decision should be taken by the residents and their local council. Nothing wrong with that either, provided it is applied fairly.

    But having the law applied on all because of the actions of a few is unfair.

    What we are witnessing in the areas mentioned above is the direct product of a restrictive society and culture. Remove that bottleneck and within a generation or two, things will change to the better.

    And we circle back to the main theme of this article; thinking that prohibition actually do work.

  90. This pretty much sounds like a case of bad township planning – like the rest (all?) of Bahrain. Las Vegas like strip? Dream on!
    I’ve been to that “strip” many times. I don’t remember seeing houses and village? I remember seeing a road with coffee shops and restaurants and a hand full of high rise apartment blocks.

    He said Bahraini women from Juffair were now getting a bad reputation because of prostitution in the area and claimed people no longer wanted to marry them.

    Oh dear – I cant marry her! – it says JUFFAIR on her CPR card!! :lol:

  91. Mahmood: I will start distilling some good hooch myself and will make it available free to whomever wants, just to spite both!

    قال تعالى: إن الذين يحبون أن تشيع الفاحشه في الذين ءامنوا لهم عذاب أليم في الدنيا والأخرة والله يعلم وأنتم لا تعلمون
    سورة النور آيه 19

    هذا الذي تريد ان تفعله لإرضاء الناس بإسم الحريه لن ينفعك بل سيكون عليك يوم القيامه. ومن اهم ان ترضيه؟ الناس ام الله؟ واذا نفيت او تفاديت الرد علي فهذا لن يغير شيء, فإنك لن تستطيع ان تنفي او ان تتفادى الله. ومثلما قال الاخ ابن الاسلام, إتقي الله في نفسك و هدانا الله و هداك الى الدين الحنيف … وأنا لست عليك بمعلما و لكن “وذكر فإن الذكرى تنفع المؤمنين” .. و السلام عليكم

    To all english readers, this is the translation of the meaning of the quranic verse.

    24:19 Those who love (to see) scandal published broadcast among the Believers, will have a grievous Penalty in this life and in the Hereafter: Allah knows, and ye know not.

    Use google’s translator if you’re interested in reading my comment.

  92. وأنا لست عليك بمعلما و لكن “وذكر فإن الذكرى تنفع المؤمنين”

    Thanks for the advice, though really unneeded, I appreciate your visit. Hopefully the first of many that you will get to understand my points of view better, chief amongst them is to live and let live, rather than bang people on their heads with threats of damnation, which really don’t work.

  93. rather than bang people on their heads with threats of damnation, which really don’t work.

    I disagree, Mahmood. Threats of damnation have worked amongst the religiously superstitious for millennia.

    Usually they can be ignored – but the danger comes when those who threaten damnation do so with the weight of direct action on their side. If their God says that they not only can threaten, but kill those who do not believe… Then one should worry.

    Unfortunately, that is the core of what the religious establishment in the Middle East wants, and has had intermittently for 1400 years.

  94. Ethan,
    I disagree. Threatening people with perpetual hell fire in the afterlife has not worked has it? People still kill each other, steal and rape.

    Regardless of what religion you subscribe to it is fair to say that religions overall have not eliminated any of these crimes. Have they? In fact, one could argue that religions have increased it. Religion for example, has had a hand in almost all wars declared by man on his fellow man.

  95. You know it is very interesting reading everones comments on this subject. Mahmood, as you mentioned in the constitution, Bahrain is a muslim state as a muslim state, alchol should not be tollerated. Its funny, because you say that our minds have been conditioned, when you dont actually realise that it is your mind that has been conditioned into the western evolvment of no religion thought. Do you not understand that removing religion is the first and foremost factor that has made the muslim nations weak on the global scale? Being sold out for a few oil barrels, and empty promises of what seems to be a modern and pleasant life style? It is fine that the majority of you are pro alcohol but having said that, please disown the religion as you give the rest of us a bad name. And as you see from the comment above from Byron saying that his american ass and expatriates will leave Bahrain, i fail to see how that is a bad thing? This will result in more jobs being offered to the unemployed Bahraini Nation. And from a non-religion perspective, alcohol is a proven drug, which only has adverse effects. So just because your an addict to this drug, does this mean we should leave the option open for the new younger generation, who are just starting their lives? Should we legalise heroin, cannabis and exstacy while we are at it? You see, if it wasnt for the western thinking which your mind is conditioned to, who say drugs such as cannabis should be illegal while drink is socially acceptable although the effects are proven worse, you would want to legalise all forms of drug use.

  96. Do you not understand that removing religion is the first and foremost factor that has made the muslim nations weak on the global scale?

    Can you substantiate this with examples?

  97. I for one would be interested to see what happens if all the foreigners up and left Bahrain…lol. Would be funny to watch most Bahrainis try and figure out how to do all the things they were previously unable to do as it was beneath them.

    As for doing the higher skilled jobs…whats preventing you from getting those jobs now…its well known you get paid less from employers…so if you have the same skills and are routinely paid less…why arent you getting those job now….just wondering.

  98. “Do you not understand that removing religion is the first and foremost factor that has made the muslim nations weak on the global scale?”

    Can you substantiate this with examples?

    Oh, no, Mahmood; that was the first thing that came to this western mind along with a lot of other not so nice stuff. :roll:

    Personally, I think our friend is confused; perhaps he might consider the alternative that “Muslim Nations” are weak on a global scale because they are Muslim Nations. OK, OK, I don’t really believe that, but if one can play that game :mrgreen:

  99. //And from a non-religion perspective, alcohol is a proven drug, which only has adverse effects. So just because your an addict to this drug, does this mean we should leave the option open for the new younger generation, who are just starting their lives?//

    Alcohol is a proven drug you are right .. and that is also true about so many medicines so are you telling me that you are going to ban those medicines as well ? if not then why banning alcohol. I dont drink cause I know its side effects and my capability ;) . Instead of focusing on banning the alcohol , MPS should focus on Education of the younger generation and give them enough knowledge to enable them to distinguish between good and bad.

  100. Hi Guys, Thanks for your responses to this issue.

    I am going to first and foremost address the first issue, which is the fact that the removal of religion has made us weak.

    What we need to understand, is that we are living in a world today where the few control the many. We are manipulated in our way of thinking, thanks to the higher agenda. In regards to religion, the western agenda on this one, is not to remove it completely, as this causes the muslims to rebel, but to simply make it detractive, and weaken it. There is a big difference. You dont remove a religon, you make the members choose not to practice, which is what we see today. This is because, if muslims, truely followed their faith, and genuinly believed in their religion, you are talking about a 1.4 billion strong community. Unfortunately, the islamic agenda, and the western agenda do not agree on the globalised market front, so unless we are conditioned to their policies and culture, we are actually a threat due to our strength. If we go back historically, it is only the malpractice of religion which caused the end to the power of the islamic empire.

    You see, when you truely believe, this means that you are not seeking the donya, but you are seeking the pleasures of the hereafter. What this means, is that you can not be bribed, you can not be manipulated, and you can not be weakend by the threat of any materialistic effort. The west, can not control the east, whilst this is happening. Instead, capitalism, and materialism, is introduced, to make you fall in love with the material world we live in, which in turn makes you weak, as you are afraid of 2 things, 1) losing your material goods i.e. house, cars etc 2) Actually leaving this world. And more importantly, this love for materialism, has caused us to treat each other in a non-brotherly fashion, and also inspired arrogance within our hearts.

    A prime example to your question, i must say, is Israel. 1 small country, with an even smaller population, surrounded by only muslims. Yet, we all sit back and watch the slaughter of innocent palestenians, and on a good day, we may go out and do a protest march. Why? This is because our love for this world, has made us soo weak, that we can not muster enough courage in order to assist our palestenian brothers, instead we sit back and watch as the americans and israelis slaughter our brothers. Now, in this instance, if we had a more proactive islamic state, would we not be able to avert such a situation? On the other hand, the major problem to this issue, is that the wealth and power which is given to our governments, who are your prime example of a non-muslim system, are more interested in maintaing power then to act according to our religion. What this has resulted in, is western military bases in all our countries in the mid east. Does this make you strong? If they dont like you tomorow, and want to get rid of you, do you even have a fighting chance? You dont even have an official army, its a joke! So what does this mean? As long as we play by their rules (western agenda) we are safe, if we play by our rules, we are finished.

    Oil is a resource which is used in order to make us weak by keeping us happy and satisfied materialistaly to make us weaker spiritually and keep as at bay. The islamic nation or shall we just say the Arab nation, used to be warriors, today they are mice. For eg. Saddam invasion of Kuwait, the Kuwaiti army were no where to be seen. We only know how to abuse and torture our own people who are weaker, but not able to do anything on a global scale. We kick people who are down. This is not how an islamic state should be.

    What we need to all recognise, if we go back to our basics, see each other us brothers, and stand together, then no system can hold us down. this is because the system relise on you not realising that they need you more than you need them.

    Unfortunately, as muslims, we only take the negative aspects of western influence, and non of the positive. We are more than capable to start our own manufacturing industry, take care of our own economics, and be a thriving nation. We are not allowed to do this though, because we must be manipulated and under the control of the Global Government. Imagine, making your own cars instead of importing? Making your own Tvs etc. You have a large enough market, and will create ample jobs therefore reduce unemployment in a significant manner.

    By the way, there are more than enough qualified labour forces in our countries to do higher skilled jobs. The problem is this continuous western manipulated mindset, which is even more sad, because we ourselves think that westerners are better than us, and smarter then us therefore they deserve the job and not us. And if you bahrainis and arabs agree to this, then this is indeed a sad day for all of us, and a prime example as to why we have become weak.

    In regards to alchol and medicine. How can you compare the 2? I dont think i really need to get into it, as it is quite obviouse.

  101. Is it only me or does anyone readying the above comment get a huge big neon flashing sign saying “CONSPIRACY THEORY RULES”?

    Hussain, I think I can take every single sentence you provided and give you many examples of why and how you are wrong. I’m not going to do that now but just to remind you of my basic question which you have not answered yet:

    Can you substantiate this with examples?

    Next, I am really intrigued by your statement:

    This is because our love for this world, has made us soo weak

    Which I take to mean that we should just strap on the latest model of an explosive belt coupled with a nicely coloured bandana around our head and go to a central market and press the button?

    Hussain. I urge you to reconsider your fast-held beliefs, especially in interpreting them in the way that you have which suggests that the world is just black and white, your way or the highway and that everyone in the world is steadfastly against you.

  102. Hussain,
    I am in danger of triggering Mahmood into critising me for not debating but for only being sarcastic but I can not help it. I will take the risk.

    There is nothing in your response that deserves a response. Nothing. You have not even answered Mahmood’s question.

    To help you in your deliberations and to get a view from the opposing camp, which I certainly advise you to do, you may find it useful to read an article by Andrew Stunich entitled; Islam Caused Islamic World’s Decline on the following link;

    http://www.islam-watch.org/Stunich/Islam-Caused-Islamic-World-Decline.htm

    Dood luck.

  103. Hussain,

    There are several things that strike me about your response; the first one is that you seem genuine in your response in the care the care and time you choose to present it. I would agree with some of the generalities you have talked about, but my overall response is WOW and too wonder about your age and exposure to this global experience you talk about.

    “What we need to all recognise, if we go back to our basics, see each other us brothers, and stand together, then no system can hold us down. this is because the system relise on you not realising that they need you more than you need them.”

    Well there is alot to say about the system including your own and the learned scholars who are not above breaking the rules to sell something to make a buck or gain more control. Rather your statement reminds me more about the civil rights movement here in America. Americans supported it because they saw black people as Americans; you seem to have this Muslim against the world mentality being stomped on but just let us get our shot and will stomp all over “them”. Sorry, your version of the Muslim religion/world just lost my vote.

    Hang in there and keep THINKING and engaging people…all peoples.

  104. I am going to first and foremost address the first issue, which is the fact that the removal of religion has made us weak.

    I thought this discussion was about interdicting alcohol in Bahrain. I guess this discussion has advanced quite impressively. At the end of the day i guess all discussions come down to religion.

    The removal of religion HAS NOT MADE US WEAK! People die everyday effing day cause they believe that their religion is the right one. Sadly, it has created a divide in a tiny nation like bahrain.

    Now lets get back to discussing alcohol. :roll: haha

  105. If we don’t step up for our freedoms, even the freedoms we do not exercise, then tomorrow they will step all over the freedoms that I do exercise and no one will stand up for me.

    Banning alcohol would hurt Bahrain economically since Bahrain has a reputation of being one of the more liberal countries in the region. Banning alcohol would lead to an exodus of expats from Bahrain, and a huge decrease in tourism (Saudi’s etc. . .). With our limited supply of oil, we are need of this variation in the country’s income in the long run.

  106. If banning alcohol, enforcing religion and suppressing freedoms in the name of religion would actually make us happy, then why aren’t Saudi’s happier than Bahraini’s?. The myth that suggests that happiness correlates with religion (as in the more religious the people, the happier they are) have been busted since forever. We have to look around us and understand that we are not a bunch of goat herders living in medieval times, we now live in a global world, where nations interact with each other and people from all around the world travel all over.

    We cannot ban them from exercising their rights, and then expect them to give us freedom to do what we wish to practice from religious and cultural activities that might collide with their beliefs.

    I currently live in Australia, and I have the right to practice my religion and my cultural and personal freedom are granted to me without questioning. How can we enforce a law that limits the rights of most of the people in the world when they visit our country and then expect them to grant us our freedoms in their countries. As an example, if we don’t allow them to consume alcohol here, why should they let us build the mosque in their countries, consume Halal food in their countries? why should they allow us to take days off work for Eid or Hajj if we ask for a work leave under religious occasions.

    Enforcing religion comes from the heart, if a person refrains from an activity from his heart, then that is faith, but if a person wishes to consume alcohol, but cant find it, well, (Ina al a3mal belneyat).

  107. if they getting 78 Drunk while on the wheels…That does not mean That an AVG of 2 guys driving Under the Influnce (DUI)

    Are They getting everyone that is driving?…
    I good Range estimate is about 20 to 200 Times that Number

    So More Like
    1520 15200 Per Month
    50.67 506.67 Per Day

    Roughly a Minimum of .025% Get into accidents

    38.00 accidents / Month From DUI
    1.27 …Per day

    U do not need to sample

  108. I totaly Agree ANN
    Very True…
    So how would explain Da Realtive Pay In Saudi
    English Get less then Americans
    Aussies Less then Americans

    + English Less then Aussies

    Does that Mean When Americans Leave the english to a Job…they wont know what to do?
    Thanks you

  109. I Like this very much
    It’s because while U are Busy with all these things.
    We get take Bahraini Jobs…and soon your Job Ann…not only here…
    London as well…
    or is it that u are here Cause Raj took yours from Birmingham?

  110. I guess its ok to take 3 to 4 times the salary as an exact quilfied Bahraini…or…1/4^2= 1/16 to an indian…but hay…U know walking out of JJ’s that late w/ that much boz in your blood…they are more skilled driving you home..U should pay 4 times “Justice is served” :lol:
    In Bahrain We have Taxes…Taxis collect.
    U know when u walk out that Joint (JJ’s)…You go Tax…
    Da Tax Man is right there.
    and Yes the other form of tax is Bombay Mix Tax…
    They Mix you up with idiots talk to the point u give up.
    Well…They tax u English for da stuff that happened there…+They Tax Bahrainis Da same way for getting da 4:1 Pay..so wake up Brother!!
    Very Funny People here Mahmood

Comments are closed.