The Ambassador Speaketh

9 Jan, '11

Interesting interview in Al-Wasat this morning in which its editor-in-chief interviewed the departing American Ambassador to Bahrain Mr Adam Ereli. The interview had three axes: reflections on his tenure in Bahrain, Freedoms of Expression as exercised (or lack thereof) in Bahrain and the Internet in particular and lastly human rights. It’s surprising and refreshing to read some straight non-diplo talk once in a while, and this interview is largely that, though judging by some of the responses the article received, a lot of people found his responses are a direct interference in the internal issues of the country while others were vehement in their refusal of everything American painting them as the Great Big Satan wherever they landed.

left to right: Rachel Graff, US Cultural & Media Ataché, Ambassador J. Adam Ereli and Dr. Mansour Al-Jamri

I must confess that I’m pleasantly surprised by the responses and his uncloaked advice to the government and his comments on the Gulf Air / Wikileaks exposé:

ليس هناك ما أخجل منه أو أخفيه، وكوني سفير الولايات المتحدة يعني أنني يجب أن أدافع عن الشركات الأميركية، وأعتقد بأننا نريد للشركات الأميركية أن تأتي للبحرين وتستثمر وأن تكون جزءا من الحياة الاقتصادية في البحرين، وهذا أمر جيد أن يتحقق لكلا البلدين، لأنها توفر فرص عمل وتعمق العلاقات الاقتصادية بين البلدين. ولكن إذا كان هناك من يعتبر أن الصفقة فيها تدخل سياسي، فهذا أمر يعود للبحرين فيما تريد فعله، أما بالنسبة لي فأنا أتحدث باسم الشركات الأميركية، بينما من حق الحكومة البحرينية أن تقرر ما تريد القيام به بسيادة تامة على قراراتها.

 

There’s nothing for me to feel ashamed of or hide, being the ambassador of the United States means that I have to defend the interests of American companies. I believe that we want American companies to come to Bahrain and invest in it and for them to be a part of the economic life of Bahrain. This is a mutually beneficial facet for both countries, because it promotes job creation and entrenches the economic relationship between both countries. But if there is anything that suggests internal interference with this deal, then this is for the Bahraini government to deal with, as for me, I speak for the American companies; however, it is within the Bahraini government’s rights to determine what its response should be within its own sovereign dictates.

and

وفي اعتقادي أن آليات التعامل مع المواقع الإلكترونية يجب أن تتسم بالشفافية والإعلان بوضوح عما هو مقبول أو غير مقبول والعقوبات التي يمكن أن تنتج عن ذلك، حتى تكون العملية واضحة، مثلما هي واضحة في قانوني التجارة والعقوبات على سبيل المثال، وإذا كانت هناك مبررات عدم وجود قانون ينظم استخدام الإنترنت لأنه شيء حديث، ولكن حين نرى مواقع أو نشرات جمعيات سياسية تغلق قبل الانتخابات من دون سبب واضح، فلاشك أن الناس ستصل إلى تفسير خاطئ في هذا الشأن.

 

وحين تغلق المواقع الإلكترونية لأفراد من دون مبرر، سوى بحسب ما تدعيه الحكومة من أنها تروج للطائفية أو تحرض على الكراهية، من دون معايير واضحة، أو أنها كانت عبارة عن مجرد قرارات اتخذها مسئولون في يوم ما من دون مبرر، فإن ذلك يعيدنا إلى مسألة ضرورة الالتزام بالشفافية في التعامل مع هذه الأمور.

 

I believe that transparency must be the mechanism to be adopted for dealing with Internet websites and [the government] must declare what is and isn’t acceptable in a clear manner and the determine the legal repercussions in order for clarity to prevail, just as in the commercial and criminal laws for example. If there are excuses for not having such laws governing the Internet due to being new, but if we witness websites or political societies publications being banned before the elections without a clear reason, then people will arrive at the wrong conclusion in this matter.

 

And if personal websites are banned without cause – either by what the government’s claim that the website propagates sectarianism without clear guidelines, or it haphazardly applies officials’ individual order without cause, then this brings back the question of the importance of the application of transparency in dealing with these matters.

as to the human rights situation:

حقوق الإنسان شيء مهم للولايات المتحدة، وجميع الأحداث الأخيرة تتم متابعتها بدقة من الولايات المتحدة، وباعتقادي أن ردة الفعل الدولية لما حدث في شهري أغسطس/ آب، وسبتمبر/ أيلول الماضيين (2010) في البحرين، تعطي مؤشراً واضحاً على ما تعنيه البحرين للعالم. كما أرى أن الحكومة البحرينية مهتمة بحقوق الإنسان من أعلى هرم فيها إلى أسفله، فاحترام وحماية حقوق المواطنين هو أمر مهم وأولوية للقيادة السياسية في البحرين.

 

ولكني أؤكد أن السرية لا تنفع في إدارة مثل هذه الأمور والشفافية مهمة حتى يعلم الناس ما يحدث في واقع الأمر، لأنهم إذا لم يروا شيئا، فمن الصعب عليهم الفهم ولكن من السهل أن يفسروا ما هو أمر غير صحيح، وقرار الحكومة بالسماح للمجتمع المدني بحضور المحكمة هو أمر مهم.

 

Human rights is very important to the United States and all the recent events were closely monitored by the United States, and it is my view that the international community’s repercussions to what has happened in August and September of 2010 in Bahrain gives a clear indication as to the high regard given to Bahrain by the international community. I see that the Bahraini government is interested in human rights from the top of its pyramid to the bottom, as respect of the citizens and their security is a matter of high priority to the political leadership in Bahrain.

 

But I emphasise that secrecy does not work in managing these issues and transparency is important so that people know the reality of what is happening because if they do not see something, then it becomes very difficult for them to understand but becomes easy to be lead to the wrong conclusion. The government’s decision to allow civil observers to the [so called terrorism] trial is important.

Impressive! I can’t add any more to this as his views – surprisingly – tally with my own and I have expressed them as such over and over again in my various writings. I wonder how the government is going to deal with this one. We’ll see how the barometer lies tomorrow by the headlines in the other local papers. Should be fun!

How long does he have before leaving again, and will that be accelerated due to this piece?

Note: the above are my imperfect translations but are current best efforts. I’m sure that the American embassy will probably translate the transcript and make it available on their website or to whomever asks.

Filed in: Human RightsPolitics
Tagged with:

Comments are closed.

Back to Top