Why so emotional? It’s only football!

Posted on

Feb 9th should be just like any other day in the year. What’s so special about it? This year, 2005, it falls on a Wednesday which is the end of the working week for a lot of people in Bahrain. This year however, there’s a football match between Bahrain and Iran. We humiliated them the last time we played, and that was for the world cup qualifier. The Iranians are getting their knickers in a major twist that all of their voices have become a bit too squeaky! They’ll be thrashed once again tomorrow night. Mark my words.

An anonymous commenter felt just as hyper about the match tomorrow night that he left the following comment which rather than moving it to the Forum where it belongs and where it should have been entered in the first place, I’ve moved it here into a post on its own, judging by how important this historic event is in our small island with recorded history going back more than 6,000 years.

Here you go:

Bahrain is playing for the World Cup Qualifier tomorrow and, not that I’m imposing here, I think we need to discuss a few things. There are A LOT of Bahrain people of Iranian descent who are supporting Bahrain. However, there are also quite a few of them who are supporting Iran. To give you an example of the Iranian mentality, here’s a quote taken from some moron’s website (irankicks.com):

Will Bahrain’s national team play Iran or a team allegedly representing Bahrain would show up on the field?

My intention is not to belittle a place on the map, south center of the Persian Gulf, called Bahrain!

By no means I intend to insult 677,886 of people living in this former colony of England and a place that has been disputed as a part of greater Iran.

No, I wouldn’t intend to insult the countrymen and women of Bahrain.

I don’t need to!

The team that called itself Bahrain’s national team did a fantastic job of insulting anyone from that country three years ago when they played Iran in Manama during the 2002 World Cup qualifying matches.

Do I have grudges against Bahrain? What grudges?
One keep grudges against someone, a team, that is worthy of holding grudges against.

In that evening, the team allegedly representing the nation of Bahrain (with all her 33 years of history), forgot which country they were playing for, and the color of money, mixed with the color of a flag, not of Bahrain, demonstrated for once and all whom the players wearing Bahrain’s uniform were truly playing for.

I respect many Arab nations and their sportsmen and sportswomen because they respect themselves and their country’s prides.

Even Saudi Arabia plays hard and plays to win. One has to respect that.

But Bahrain…

Bahrain’s football team doesn’t deserve to be called a national team until they prove that in fact they represent a nation (with all her 33 years of history) and not the servants of a different flag or perhaps more accurately, the servants of money under a different flag!

Until then, it is accurate to simply state:
Iran is scheduled to play against a team from Bahrain on February 9th!

It is furthermore appropriate to state that on that evening, we wish nothing but a hard defeat for the alleged Bahraini players in the hands of the Iran’s national team!

By Irankicks correspondent Kaveh Mahjoob

I’ve actually deleted a lot of things this cunt has written, but I believe you got the message. All of Iran is pissed off about what happened before last year’s world cup. What’s alarming me is the fact that many Bahrainis (mainly ajams) have this “motherland” mentality and would sell their passports in a heart-beat if they could. I say they should take the next one way ticket to Tehran and keep supporting their own national team. If Bahrain makes it to the World Cup, I’m pretty sure we will see a country that will have real heroes for the youths to look up to because currently, there’s not a lot of Bahraini people who are considered “role models”.

signature
9 Comments
  • anonymous
    8 February 2005

    Why so imotional? It’s only football!

    [quote]Even Saudi Arabia plays hard and plays to win. One has to respect that.
    [/quote]

    Is that the same Saudi Arabia that Germany beat 8-0 in the last World Cup?

  • anonymous
    9 February 2005

    Trackback :: Today’s the day: Bahrain nationalism and Iran

    TrackBack from BahrainBlogs

    Homer’s View on bahrainblogs.com

  • anonymous
    12 February 2005

    Why so emotional? It’s only football!

    I’m curious to know, are all the players on the Bahrain national football team from Bahrain?? I don’t know much about the GCC football teams, but I watched the final of the Gulf Cup in December, between Qatar and Oman and was surprised to see quite a few African players on the Qatar team. Is that the case with Bahrain as well?

  • mahmood
    12 February 2005

    Re: Why so emotional? It’s only football!

    I don’t think so… Bahrain does “head hunt” athletes especially in track and field, but not for football, we’ve got football stars in just about any neighbourhood with a small plot ot kick a ball around! I could be mistaken though…

  • anonymous
    12 February 2005

    Why so emotional? It’s only football!

    i think qatar pays professional international standards for their players – ours are all homegrown .. they play from the heart!

    JJ

  • anonymous
    13 February 2005

    Why so emotional? It’s only football!

    This column was published in the Bahrain Tribune in response to the writer, good read

    Local issues: Vitriol attacks must not ruin World Cup spirit

    Shereen Bushehri:
    In disputes or arguments, the easiest weapon to use is name-calling and verbal abuse. Vitriol attacks, because of their ugly nature, make you feel uneasy and disturb you. But they never win a case.
    They do not make their author stronger in the face of the enemy, and in fact demoralise and reduces his or her value. In the books of history, never has an opponent won a battle fair and square through name-calling.
    Bahrain’s national team and I do stress NATIONAL with all the pride that vibrates in my soul will meet Iran’s football team on February 9 as part of the World Cup 2006 qualifying matches.
    A story was posted yesterday on an Iranian website that viciously attacks Bahrain’s football team, our country’s history and sense of pride. The writer, a certain Kaveh Mahjoob, in his editorial says that Bahrain beat Iran in October 2001 because the players were mercenaries for Saudi Arabia, that they were motivated by money and that “a place on the map, south centre of the Persian Gulf, called Bahrain� had a history that was only 33 years old (!) and as such did not deserve to beat Iran.
    He questioned the player’s loyalty to Bahrain and argued that they were playing for another country (Saudi Arabia in this case because Bahrain’s win allowed Saudi Arabia to go through and eliminated Iran). Kaveh Mahjoob wrote that “the team allegedly representing the nation of Bahrain forgot which country they were playing for, and the colour of money, mixed with the colour of a flag, not of Bahrain, demonstrated for once and all whom the players wearing Bahrain’s uniform were truly playing for.�
    Our national players represent Bahrain as a country and the Gulf as a region. They are loyal to their nation and government. They have no intention at all to represent another nation. We live and work as Bahrainis – our pride is with the Bahraini flag which we cherish and seek to make soar higher than anything else. Our fondness of the flag of the Kingdom of Bahrain with its white serrations and red colour has led us to make the largest flag in the world. If some Bahraini players carried in their jubilations after their historic victory over Iran in 2001 the flag of Saudi Arabia alongside that of Bahrain, then what is the issue? A Bahraini player, Khamis Eid, was then playing for a Saudi team, and he had the right to encourage the team he liked. Bahrain and Saudi Arabia are not only within the same bloc, but also neighbours, friends, and families. We have long ties with this nation not only through our governments and business people, but also our families have married into each other. The Gulf people are one family.
    If the Bahraini team wins an international match, it can carry the flags of the Gulf nation for it is a matter of pride for the region. The real issue with the column is that Kaveh Mahjoob transports the vitriol to other fields than football. He for instance attacks Bahrain’s history, stating that “the question is who will truly be Iran’s opponent on February 9th? Will Bahrain’s national team play Iran or a team allegedly representing Bahrain would show up on the field? My intention is not to belittle a place on the map, south centre of the Persian Gulf, called Bahrain! By no means I intend to insult 677,886 of people living in this former colony of England and a place that has been disputed as a part of greater Iran. No, I wouldn’t intend to insult the countrymen and women of Bahrain. I don’t need to!�
    Ridiculous! Utter nonsense. Bahrain has over 5,000 years of history dating back to the Dilmun civilisation which flourished here because it found the land and the people highly auspicious. Other civilisations also came and settled here. Even the more modern “invaders� settled in Bahrain when they came to the Gulf because they knew that it was the most hospitable land.
    Let me remind you Bahrain has a longer history than Iran. Dilmun civilisation started in Bahrain back in 3200 BC while the Persian empire was founded Cyrus the Great in 550 BC. So yes our history is rather richer than yours. Bahrain has grand historical sites and is home to the world’s largest burial mounds. We are proud of our history. People all around the world come down to study our artifacts and history. We are a nation wealthy with its history, culture and traditions. His claim that we have 33 years of history is absurd. Let me correct him. We gained our political independence 33 years ago and since then, Bahrain has been built into a nation of democracy, spirit, freedom and harmony. Our people do not opt for verbal abuse when they speak about other nations. We are proud of our hospitality and kind gestures – diplomacy exists in our books. It is more than a word. It is a way of life that permeates every aspect of our daily living.
    Kaveh Mahjoob makes fun of the number of Bahrainis. Again, he is wrong. We are not 677,886 as he said, but less than that, about 400,000. Less than 4,000 of them play football, and out of these “hundreds�, a formidable team has been set up and has beaten teams belonging to nations where millions are active in football clubs.
    Sorry, but size does not matter. It is achievements, and achievements on the field. That is what frustrates many people, such as Kaveh Mahjoob, who believe that Bahrain is “unworthy� of winning matches, let alone beating the “mighty� team of Iran.
    Sorry, but Bahrain and Iran stand equal chances to qualify, regardless of anything else and the only truth is the one prevails on the field. If the Iranian team can beat Bahrain’s national team, then let the best team win.
    Amidst such realities, why opt for abuse, harassment and vitriol attacks? Is that how Kaveh Mahjoob expects his team to win its matches? Does he fear that it might lose again and not reach the World Cup because of Bahrain? This attack on Bahrain does not make Kaveh Mahjoob stronger, but makes him look pitiful. For a nation like Iran should not opt to take such psychological steps to seek to undermine Bahrain’s morale. It has a long history in sports. It should not be remembered as a team that uses harassment to win its matches?
    I am a Bahraini of Iranian origin. My great grandfather came to this country looking for a better life. This is the only country I know and cherish. My loyalty is to the Bahraini leadership. And yes when Bahrain plays against Iran, I will be there cheering the Bahraini team, applauding its prowess and praising its players. Centuries ago, Corneille said: “To win without peril is to win without glory�. So let the game just remain what it is: a game where fair play (and not vitriol attacks on the Bahraini national identity) dominates and may the best win.
    Last update on: 12-1-2005

  • anonymous
    5 June 2005

    Why so emotional? It’s only football!

    It’s simple, play fair football and earn back the respect.

  • anonymous
    5 June 2005

    Why so emotional? It’s only football!

    Hi yes i think its only football
    and i think we gonna win in tehran kiram to konetoon (im from japan) thats mean in japanis we gonna win

  • chalk66x
    5 June 2005

    Why so emotional? It’s only football!

    Here’s the link of a youth soccer organization I’ve been involved with for 10 years. It would be a good feeder organization for Bahrain to funnel kids to club soccer and then on into the National team.[url]http://soccer.org/[/url] Good referee and coaching instruction and a great way to get kids started in organized soccer.

    billT

Previous
Bye Porkie…