Human Rights

Shaikh Isa Qasim Sentenced. Now what?

Shaikh Isa Qasim Sentenced. Now what?

21 May, '171 Comment

After more than a year or toing and froing, Shaikh Isa Qasim, Hussain Alqassab and Mirza Aldurazi get a suspended sentence of one year in jail, three years probation, the appropriation of over BD 3 million collected as “khums” – a religious tax of 20% of surplus profits given by followers of the Shia tradition […]

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No Tolerance for Free Press or Thought

No Tolerance for Free Press or Thought

27 Apr, '171 Comment

Bahrain is not unique in it’s depressed ranking on the just released RSF Press Freedom Index. Many have suffered greatly depressed rankings due to opportunistic and knee-jerk reaction to malleable definitions of terrorism, readily penalising the press, photojournalists, bloggers and anyone with a dissenting voice. This year, Middle Eastern countries have further moved down the index and now […]

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DurazSiege True Stories: Day 301

DurazSiege True Stories: Day 301

18 Apr, '170 Comments

I was barred from walking through the checkpoint at Oxygen Gym to my house which is just 300 meters away last night due to the ongoing #DurazSiege. The policeman insisted that it is closed for all traffic, including pedestrians, and I have to go to the main checkpoint at the entrance of Avenue 36. That […]

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False starts are common. Is this another one?

False starts are common. Is this another one?

16 Mar, '174 Comments

Something’s up. I – like the majority of Bahrainis – have become pessimistic and always looking for hidden meanings. This latest feeling descended on me when I heard that a staunch loyalist MP invited the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid bin Ra’ad Alhussein to come to Bahrain to personally investigate the situation here […]

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Gratitudes and the Duraz Siege

Gratitudes and the Duraz Siege

27 Aug, '167 Comments

Today, I choose to reflect on our village Duraz’s siege from my own perspective. We are having to suffer long queues of cars to report to a police checkpoint – one of only two for a village and an area that hosts over 20,000 residents – to get home.

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