It’s going to rain..

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and you can bet your bottom Dollar on this prediction, and it’s going to happen soon.

Why am I so sure? Well, because he asked for the traditional rain-dance! When that happens you better believe that the best forecasters were hard at work predicting when it’s going to happen!

Hang on a minute.. isn’t looking into the future against Islamic teachings?

Time to get the wellies out again.

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37 Comments
  • iDip
    25 March 2006

    lol rain dance!!

    I’ve always thought about the “istiska” prayers.
    They’re for arid & semi-arid areas like arabia or sahara, but what about south-east asia and the amazon? will it be a curse dance?!

  • Anonymous
    25 March 2006

    iDip please don’t tell me you are trying to crack a joke…and as for salat-el-istiska…..its not a prediction….and it has nothing to do with seeing the future and plus its not a rain dance (better use proper wordings and meanings because accuracy in communication is very important to avoid misunderstandings). Well back to Salat-el-istiska, for the ones who don’t know its a prayer in which one asks Allah for rain…for water which is the essence of life and looking at the geographical location of the gulf, the prophet and his companions used to perform it if the rain used to get delayed for several weeks/months.

    All viewers visit:
    http://www.islam-qa.com/

    A website I recently found, its an amazing Islamic Knowledge Base. InshAllah it will help you improve your islamic knowledge.

    “Help one another in righteousness and piety, but do not help one another in sin and transgression.” surat Al-Ma’idah, (verse 2).

    Narated By Abu Huraira : The Prophet said, “Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, should serve his guest generously; and whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, should unite the bond of kinship (i.e. keep good relation with his Kith and kin); and whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, should talk what is good or keep quite.” (Shahi Bukhari, Volume 008, Book 073, Hadith Number 160)

  • A Shii
    26 March 2006

    Was it not Abu Hurayrah (Literally translates to “Father of the little kitty”) who said: I heard the Prophet say: “Whomsoever eats onions from Mecca shall go to Heaven” in order to help someone sell his onions before sunset?

    A Shii

  • Ms. Secular
    26 March 2006

    I always thought of this blog as a non-religous, very political one.
    Are we seeing it’s true colours all of a sudden?
    Hmmm,
    A thought to ponder on….

  • bahraini4eva
    26 March 2006

    Well I agree that this prayer is not a rain dance, nor is it a prediction of the future. It is a prayer in hope for rain. So, please try to read and understand before just spitting out nonsense!

  • Mohammed
    26 March 2006

    When you pray; you are asking Allah for favor, help, etc. and in that case to have rain. And you are not expecting the nature to respond to your movements … what you hope that Allah fulfill your needs.

  • iDip
    26 March 2006

    Mr./Mrs./Ms. Anonymous,

    Thanx for the feedback.

    But apparently you focused on a part of my comment not on the other, which is concerned about the rainy areas of the world.
    Isn’t Islam for every one? so what kind on prayer will the amazon tribes perform if they want the rain to stop? (assuming they’re muslims)

    and if you were alert enough, you’ll notice that I didn’t try “to crack a joke”, instead I cracked on one 😉

  • mahmood
    26 March 2006

    Wow, a number of people have taken offence!

    This must be a GOOD THING™ if I apply the moronic logic of Mohammed Khalid!

  • Mike C
    26 March 2006

    So what exactly constitutes a drought in Bahrain or KSA? Phoenix AZ just went 140 days without measurable rain. Would a period like that even bear mentioning in any of the Persian Gulf nations?

  • Salman Al-Rahma
    26 March 2006

    Mahmoode says:
    ‘When you pray; you are asking Allah for favor, help, etc. and in that case to have rain. And you are not expecting the nature to respond to your movements … what you hope that Allah fulfill your needs.’

    And your point is..?

  • Anonymous
    26 March 2006

    seems like the owner of this blog wants to gain fame through controversy.

    nice strategy.

  • mahmood
    26 March 2006

    Welcome to all new readers of Mahmood’s Den! Stick around and read some more, I would be happy to make your acquantance…

    I’m just wondering where most of you are coming from, there must have been a link put about this particular article on some other blog or forum.

    In any case, welcome!

  • bahraini4eva
    26 March 2006

    No offense taken Mahmood. We are all entited to speak freely. We just have different opinions.

  • Joker
    26 March 2006

    I would like to applaud our neighbor king for this very wise strategy of calling the people to pray for rain. Moreover, I would like to voice another request (if he takes them.) Please call the nation to pray against bird flu ifection. If that works out, please cross out the ministry of health, save the money for more mosques, and we’ll protect our selves by saying “grace” before we eat.

    The Joker

  • Anonymous
    27 March 2006

    Just pure crap Mahmood, always was a big fan of yours but cranking such a joke out of “prayers” is just a scream for attention, and i guess ur loving it with all these comments coming in from new comers so fast eh?

  • Ms. Secular
    27 March 2006

    Controversy? More like Offence!

    Joker, before making any more stupid remarks, you should pay more attention to science versus religon programmes and to be specific a possible “Nobel Prize” research conducted by an Egyptian Scientist that was broadcasted on MBC 1 just 3 days ago. You could do with a new name. I personally suggest “Ignorant”

  • The Joker
    27 March 2006

    Ms. Secular, before you advise me about changing names, you might want to think about revising yours if you know what it means.

    “Zewail’s current research is devoted to developments of ultrafast lasers and electrons for studies of dynamics in chemistry and biology. In the field of femtochemistry, developed by the Caltech group, the focus is on the fundamental, femtosecond (10-15 second) processes in chemistry and in related fields of physics and biology.”

    Doesnt sound to me like he prays for atoms to come together, does he now?

    Religion is faith and spirituallity. Science is measurements and observations. Both are good, but not the same.

  • mahmood
    27 March 2006

    but cranking such a joke out of “prayers” is just a scream for attention

    Why? Don’t you see this whole “prayer for rain” a bit hilarious? I do! How can prayer change weather patterns?

    And on a current time-frame, don’t you find it even funnier that these calls for prayers only happen when they are almost sure that it will rain? Don’t you see that they’re using this as yet another political tool, demonstration of piety and direct connection to Allah?

    Why don’t you look at the bigger picture before attacking me? Read between the lines, it will do you good in the long run.

  • mahmood
    27 March 2006

    Ms. Secular, I would add to The Joker’s explanation there that religion and science just do not mix well – read that as at all – together, and you will never find a successful and serious scientist who is religious or even believes in God, for obvious reasons.

    That is unless you call our clerics “scientists” as they like to be called, that’s just a label whom fools believe in and relay. I call them religious clerics, knowledgeable in religion for sure, but scientists? Not a chance.

    And thank you for your kind words about my blog.

  • Chanad
    27 March 2006

    I have to say, I’m not sure what the big issue is about praying for rain Mahmood. People all over the world pray for their sick parents to recover, for the RedSox to beat the Yankees, for world peace, whatever. The only time I see this as a problem would be if, for example, one were to pray for a TB patient to recover as a substitute for medical treatment. Otherwise, what’s the harm?

    As you said, science and religion don’t mix well. However when you tell people not to pray for rain you aren’t separating the two… in fact you’re trying to impose science on religion. Science and religion are two completely different paradigms about the universe, which for the most part are completely unable to comprehend each other. Therefore you can’t sit in one paradigm and try to make a normative statement about the other.

    Telling someone that it is unscientific to pray implies a mixing of science and religion. To acknowledge the separation of the two would be to say that science is unable to prove or disprove the effect of religious prayer.

    (However, I don’t discount your claim that King Abdullah might be be using this as a political tool.)

  • CerebralWaste
    27 March 2006

    Sadly Chan’ad the good Lord rarely answers our prayers to beat the Yankees. Makes sense though. There are more New Yorkers praying to beat the Sox than there are of us praying to beat the Yankees!

  • Chanad
    27 March 2006

    one more thing. you said:

    you will never find a successful and serious scientist who is religious or even believes in God, for obvious reasons.

    ????!!!

    what about newton, maxwell, eddington, heisenberg, planck, to mention just a tiny few??

  • mahmood
    27 March 2006

    I’m not imposing anything Chan’ad. What I am stating is mere fact: there is no way that any amount of prayer can change the weather. Prayer if used to find inner peace within oneself or even as an obligation which must be practiced, then that’s fine, but telling people to pray in order to change the weather? Come on.. be reasonable, if you believe that then maybe praying for “the whale to spit the moon out” would be a good explanation of the lunar eclipse! And for the uninitiated there is a special prayer for that as well, and that prayer is to beseech the whale to spit the moon!

    As to scientists believing in God, well I grant you that. There must have been many. However the point is that if a scientist stopped his or her exploration of scientific boundaries because his or her God says that particular area is a no no, or why bother as it has been proven in religious text anyway, well, that’s just nonsense.

    Having God on a scientist’s side would surely limit his ability to push the envelope and take humanity to the next level. Scientists need to investigate and create without having religious limits.

    Now I fully realise and understand moral and religious limits to scientific exploration. I – personally – understand that, and would even support a certain ban on specific scientific discovery, this is because of my own prejudices and the way I was brought up and the culture I was brought up in, however I realise that this particular view IS wrong. Science advanced in the past and continues to advance today specifically because it went into taboo areas and opened them up, with time it became acceptable. Can you imagine “the pill” being produced in the middle ages?

    Science should not be limited.

  • billT
    27 March 2006

    Mahmood by any chance is there a stop rain dance. We have been under either a flash flood watch or flash flood warning for 3 weeks now. Ive been keeping my camera with me in case I see someone building an ark or here in Hawaii it might be a big canoe.

    billT

  • mahmood
    27 March 2006

    No freekin’ idea billT, except praying for everyone’s safety?

  • Anonymous
    28 March 2006

    But a recent survey published in the leading science journal Nature conclusively showed that the National Academy of Science is anti-God to the core. A survey of all 517 NAS members in biological and physical sciences resulted in just over half responding. 72.2 % were overtly atheistic, 20.8 % agnostic, and only 7.0 % believed in a personal God. Belief in God and immortality was lowest among biologists. It is likely that those who didn’t respond were unbelievers as well, so the study probably underestimates the level of anti-God belief in the NAS. The unbelief is far higher than the percentage among scientists in general, or in the whole population.

  • mahmood
    28 March 2006

    Oh look! The prayers have been answered ON SCHEDULE!

    Saudi forecast for 28 Mar 2006

    Now, can the king ask for the faithful to pray for the eradication of the terrorism cancer nurtured and glorified on his patch? Especially that he obviously has a direct link to Allah?

  • Adel
    28 March 2006

    No kidding, 6 drops of rain fell on my car window while driving today. Does anybody know what’s the affected area for each prayer, and how to control the quantity, cos I’m planning to start a lawn this summer, and don’t want to spend a lot of money on water.

  • Joker
    28 March 2006

    First of all, why is it a joke when other people perform a rain dance and unspeakable when its us? Other people have their beliefs just like us.

    Second, Chanad, what does the list of scientists mean? I know for a fact Newton was a self-proclaimed athiest. He was more than that. Its like saying Darwin believed in creation.

  • Chanad
    28 March 2006

    I know for a fact Newton was a self-proclaimed athiest. He was more than that.

    Try google. Here some useful places to start:
    http://www.isaac-newton.org/
    http://www.newtonproject.ic.ac.uk/prism.php?id=44

    In one of the tracts Newton writes:

    Atheism is so senseless & odious to mankind that it never had many professors.

    Newton was not an atheist, but rather, a heretic… there is a big difference. Newton rejected many orthodox views of christianity (eg Trinitarianism), but he was still a strong believer in religion.

    This raises a very important point. Mahmood wrote:

    However the point is that if a scientist stopped his or her exploration of scientific boundaries because his or her God says that particular area is a no no, or why bother as it has been proven in religious text anyway, well, that’s just nonsense.

    Certainly, dogma, orthodoxy and the church have put down strict limits (often with threats of violence) on the exploration of scientists. However a personal belief in a god/religion does not of necessity impose such limits on scientists. Many of the luminary scientists I listed in my previous comment were, like Newton, criticized by the orthodoxy for their scientific endeavours, but maintained their own intense personal religious beliefs.

    Mahmood said:

    What I am stating is mere fact: there is no way that any amount of prayer can change the weather.

    This is certainly not a very scientific fact. What kind of scientific experiment could you conduct to conclusively prove the statement?? A more agreeable statement would be:

    There is no conclusive scientific evidence to prove a causal relationship between prayer and weather.

    Quite a large leap is required to jump from the latter assertion to the former.

    But anyways, if you want to assert that prayer is unscientific, then that is fine (and I would agree!), but you can’t at the same time claim that you seprating science and religion. The statement implies that you are making a scientific assertion about religion. This is exactly the same (but inverted) as those people who try to justify religion based on science (like this hilarious work).

  • Ahmed
    29 March 2006

    Time is 4:03 AM – 29th March 2006.

    Strong winds and Rains outside.

    Winds: From SSE 13 km/h according to Weather.com. People prayed and got the rain.

  • mahmood
    29 March 2006

    yes i can see that, the frangipani is naked and its leaves are all over the garden… that’s mar / apr weather in this area for you.

    can they pray again in jun-aug timeframe please?

  • Adel
    29 March 2006

    I think these rains are called Alsarayat and like Mahmood said they come yearly about this time. It rains for more than 2-3 days in some years, its a sign of the end of winter.

  • Adel
    29 March 2006

    To be fair Salat Al Istisqa is only for when the rain is late in Winter , its not for praying for rain at any time of the year.

  • mahmood
    29 March 2006

    To be fair Salat Al Istisqa is only for when the rain is late in Winter

    That’s cheating!

    There’s going to be an eclipse today… they could combine both prayers and get a two-for-one deal.

  • Qatar Cat
    29 March 2006

    It’s raining in Qatar too.. Two days in a row now! I wonder whether the King had checked the forecast before he ordered the prayers? :^)

    I saw the rain prediction on Yahoo weather a week ago!

    =^..^=

  • Qamrul A. Khanson
    17 June 2007

    Whenever there is no rain and people would like to see rain in their land, Muslims have been advised that they should pray two rakat of Salat Istiska and supplicate in the court of Almighty The-God to enshower rain. This has been the tradition of Prophet and one should trust The-God to fulfil the supplications for rain. It works and it happens for those who have trust and patience with Almighty The-God.

    Such supplications work for the necessities too but it does not mean that human leave the material demand and sit on only for spiritual success. Material demands shall be settled first and the shortcomings are filled by spiritual supplications to God.

    Imagine if you continually pray with out food and water. The end result will be death to you. In order to be enriched with spirituality, your material body shall be viable. That is how we supplicate to enrich ourselves against odds (Amen).

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