Mayday May Day

I wonder why that international destress sign is “Mayday”, is it because the capitalists have finally gave up calling for their workers to turn up on May 1st and then if any of their customers asks them why deliveries are not made, or products are not manufactured, they just shrug their shoulders and say: well it’s May day? Or was it to celebrate a riot by workers demanding better work conditions in which some sacrificed their lives to achieve?

No idea, but happy May Day if you celebrate it.

I did: started at 5.30 am checked the blog and emails, went outside and fixed the mess that the bloody water department repair brainiacs did, which is trample (I kid you not) on all of my gazanias in the outside bed, CHOP a big part of the frangipani “because they couldn’t reach the water leak properly” which is translated that they were bloody lazy to bend down a bit further, and generally all but destroyed my outside planter.

The good part in all of this is that now:

    1. I chopped up what they chopped up off the frangipani and made 4 good cuttings and planted those in another planter.
    2. I removed all the trampled-on gazania and shaped the remaining third to the front of the planter, and clearned the back and middle completely of gazania.
    3. I toiled the bed and mixed in some peat moss to prepare it for other plantings.
    4. generally cleaned up the planters outside.
    5. Oh, and they fixed the leak!

That took care of time till about 8.00 when I was called in for breakfast. Soon after that I went out and toiled the main path flower beds to prepare them for probably some zinneas and portalucas. That was followed by power washing the pool deck! 😀 That took care of the time till about 11.30.

Then I took Hanan to the Book Case on Budaiya road to buy some study material, then went to the Najibi centre for a hair cut. It was and it’s looking good. (thought I’d say that before some smart alec asks the usual “which one?” question.)

Back home now and it’s bloody hot now… about to have lunch and then jump in the pool, waiting for it to cool a bit before I return to gardening etc.

How was your day?

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30 Comments
  • Joker
    1 May 2006

    My day was no where as good as your. Last night I had a flat tire in the busiest cross road in Bahrain (under the seef bridge). Pushed the car to a curb.. and when I wanted to change the tire with the spare.. surprise surprise the spare is also flat. So I spent all morning changing tires and getting them back under the scorching heat. But hey.. the day isnt over yet 😉

  • mahmood
    1 May 2006

    that’s the spirit, keep on the positive side and someone tell me why we don’t have AA road-side assistance here?

  • the Cloggy from Oz
    1 May 2006

    mayday is from… French. It’s derived from m’aider, help me.

    This message is brought to you as part of Education Permanente: when you stop learning, it’s time to close the coffin.

    But to answer your question: my day was pretty pedestrian: work in the office. Has been a bit hectic lately, so today is good day to catch up with things. But I am lucky: I work a fixed number of working days in a year. So I can take this one another time, like for a diving holiday or so. Whoa, daydreaming mode is kicking in…….

    Joop

  • K from Oslo
    1 May 2006

    May Day is a national holiday in Norway, so whilst the political left traditionally was out marching, the political right would do gardening:)

  • mahmood
    1 May 2006

    Yay, I like Oslo, as well as Cloggies who have flexible working arrangements… any of you have a high-paying job available for me? pretty please? 😉

  • the Cloggy from Oz
    1 May 2006

    who is having a high paying job over here? 😉
    In Oslo you can earn a fortune, but after tax there is not a lot left 🙁
    I always thought that the people you see there gardening (K’s political right) are just growing their own vegetables…..

    And here you pay no tax 🙂

  • Ingrid
    1 May 2006

    My day has not quite started even though it’s a little after 10 am. I am hoping to write a post on my blog, go out for lunch with my mom (visiting from Holland) my husband and our 3yr old. Then I hope to work on a kid’s version of permaculture for kids (cloggy oz might recognize the word, it originates from Australia) so that I could do my home version for the long summer holiday for my 8yr old (wish me luck) and maybe incorporate building structures for and with kids (some invited lucky ones).
    It’ll be a working day though, continuing on the daily grinds of keeping house (and one wonders why I like to blog(surf)..
    oh, and checking out my vegetable plants trying to figure out which one is which because I don’t remember which seeds I planted where! On a happy note; my yellow squask is starting to form (as in the squash, that I planted a while back) and my cucumers are started to crawl up so I can’t wait to harvest something…can’t help it but I look at them everyday doing a ‘what the bleep’ thing mentally talking to them saying ..aaah my precious, can’t wait for you to have your babies!!
    ok, that’s my cue, I need to get off my duff and do something.
    Ingrid

  • mahmood
    1 May 2006

    oh, and I harvested A tomato from the single tomato plant that decided – against all odds – to survive. We had it for lunch, but, yes cut in little individual pieaces on its own plate!

  • K from Oslo
    1 May 2006

    Yes taxes can be high, but it doesn’t seem to stop people from getting rich though, I think we have at least two or three guys on the top 100 richest people list and there are only about 4 million of us. I’m afraid I don’t have any high paying jobs laying around, as I’m only a student, but perhaps in a couple of years? I’m sure I could get you work at the garden centre though:)

  • Dr Jensen
    1 May 2006

    It was my first day back at my old job. I have been subspecialising for a longer period in another hospital just about 3 hours from where I live. It has been very challenging and exciting but it’s good to be “home”.

    A major part of the staff has half a day off on May 1 (they go home to their gardens I think). , so after lunch there was quiet, since there were only a few patients. We cleared up the department and could leave with a good conscience.
    Socialised medicine doesn’t make doctors filthy rich (sorry Mahmood)but instead there sometimes are these quiet days…..

    My way to work looks a little like The Shire from Lord of the Rings.
    When I drove home the sun was shining. It’s finally spring and the temperature was just around 16 degrees. The trees are coming into leaves and the fields are this beatiful light rich green colour.

  • Dr Jensen
    1 May 2006

    Hi K from Oslo

    Maybe it has something to do with oil 🙂

    Comparing taxes directly is difficult, since scandinavians don’t pay health insurance.
    School, high school and universities are free and in some (all?) scandinavian countries the students are supported financially by the state.
    Maternity leave between ½ and 1 year for all is expensive too but we need to breed more tax-payers to pay our pension, so we call it an investment.

    No tax? Even in the rich Norway people pay (a lot in) tax.
    As far as I have heard they have started arguing if they should (and maybe how to) use some of their money. 🙂
    When your ancestors are farmers and fishermen, money are better in the pocket than in the hand. (Danes would do the same – if we had that kind of money.)

  • Seroo
    1 May 2006

    May Day comes from the french of “Help Me” – “M’Aidez”
    It comes from the oral radio distress signal of the french air-fighters of World War II .

  • Melody
    1 May 2006

    Checking into your site from middle America today, where the temperature is near 70 degrees F. The ornamental trees in my yard are in bloom with pink blossoms, tulips shine in multicolors and the fragrance from viburnum bushes is reminiscent of cloves. If I close my eyes it seems like heaven! I am enjoying your blog, appreciating that the political commentary ends where gardening begins. There is time in life for both.

    We all need a respite from life sometimes, and the garden is a good place to find it.

  • Jared in NYC
    1 May 2006

    Ah Mahmood, my Mayday was as well planned as a Swiss riot.

    My wife and I have been staying with friends in Zurich for the past two weeks, and we’ve just returned to NY today – we deliberately took an early flight and coordinated our departure so we wouldn’t have to go through the central train station (Zurich HBB at the Bonhoff Strasse) on the way to the airport.

    Today’s the day when all the green haired kids and weirdo’s ham it up for the TV cameras and throw rocks and bottles at the Polizei. It’s a perfect day here in NYC though – time to tend our little postage strip of grass and flowers!

  • K from Oslo
    2 May 2006

    Hi Dr Jensen,
    We’re just saving it all for a rainy day, apparently:) I think they are reluctant to pour too much petrodollars into the economy for fear of inflation, but with oil prices over $70 a barrel some people are obviously getting hold of a few pennies.
    No weather for gardening (or flower potting) so I’ve been a good student most of the day but i also managed to go for a walk in the rain. There is a lovely smell of early spring in the air and as the day is an official flag day all the flags made it feel a bit more festive.

  • chrisamillion
    2 May 2006

    I could jump in a pool right about now…too much stuff t do at the moment!

  • billT
    2 May 2006

    May Day itself came about as a result of a labor unions strike for an eight-hour work day in Chicago May 1st thru 4th 1886.

    Its celebrated world wide just not in America where business and goverment got togeather to have Labor Day instead.

  • mahmood
    2 May 2006

    Ahhh, it’s good when you realise that all the world is not doom and gloom! I’m glad that you all are enjoying your particular weather and gardens, or even the lack thereof. Remember the good times, it’s probably the only thing that unites the whole world, without recourse to religion or politics.

    Seroo I’m not sure what kind of radios those were in WWII, but I hope they spoke into them rather than stuffed them down their throats!! :>

    Glad you enjoyed your holidays Jared, I pretty miffed though that you didn’t jump on a plane for a simple 6-hour flight to Bahrain for a quick BBQ in my garden!

    K and Dr. Jensen, the Shura Council here first proposed that the government should keep 10% of the oil revenue in a fund for “future generations,” that got whittled down to $1 per barrel, and now we have $1 only if the price per barrel exceeds $40. And even then it’s not approved. Although we don’t have taxes in this country, it doesn’t seem that the government and our appointed and elected MPs bother with the future much.

    Melody, I couldn’t have said it better and your line should certainly be considered for this blog’s tag!

    political commentary ends where gardening begins. There is time in life for both.

    Viva la gardening!

  • mahmood
    2 May 2006

    BillT, this is precisely (arabic) why the first elected parliament in Bahrain (1973) shot down a bill to celebrate the occasion, giving reference to its start in the US, and supported by the evil socialists in Russia.

    Thankfully, the king now saw better and declared it a holiday only a couple of years ago for us to enjoy.

  • a Duoist
    2 May 2006

    High up in the Nevada Sierras, May Day is marked by a riot of flowering color: poppies are spectacularly orange flame, the dogwood trees are giant snow cones of white ice, and the flowering plums are traffic-stopping pink. In a few weeks, millions of bright Monarch butterflies will be flying through on their migration, turning some of these flowering trees into pulsating explosions of orange whenever the feeding Monarchs take to the air simultaneously.

    With God’s bounty and beauty on such display, the politicization of May Day by the political left seems somehow to be…all too human.

  • Jared in NYC
    2 May 2006

    Drat, I missed my chance for a Mahmood BBQ! I’ve been hankering after a shawarma, and I don’t even know what it is really 😉

  • mahmood
    2 May 2006

    Mark! over to you 🙂

    But until Mark responds, have a look at Wikipedia and let your juices flow in anticipation!

    Also have a look at this for recipes etc.

  • Jared in NYC
    2 May 2006

    More on Swiss Mayday:
    http://www.swissinfo.org/eng/front/detail/May_Day_marked_by_violent_clashes.html?siteSect=105&sid=6674889&cKey=1146553997000

    If you spend some time there, it’s hard to believe this happens until you witness it, though it’s often put down to “foreign aggitators”. Meanwhile, here in NY and other American cities, there were large demonstrations by (mostly) hispanic immigrants, but these protests were of a much different character. Many or most of the protesters are illegal immigrants with a powerful work ethic.

    The political atmosphere around this is very complex, and it’s interesting to hear liberal and conservative commentators try to boil it down with agitprop, but they all get it wrong when they try.

  • mahmood
    2 May 2006

    unbelievable. I thought Bahrain had the exclusive rights to violent demonstrations!

  • ShawarmaBoy
    2 May 2006

    Jared

    Flights leave on the hour to Bahrain from JFK and Boston. Do yourself a favor a GO!! Have a DOZEN of so shawarma. You can even put them on MY TAB at a a dozen or so differant Shawarma places around the Island. Just tell them the are for me.

    Now that I think about it Mahmood, Joker, SBG,Tooners will one of you stop by Grill Land, pick up a dozen BEEF shawarma for me, drop them off at AMH and tell them to mark the package “MEDICAL SUPPLIES” and have them send it to me? I would be forever in your debt! mmmm shawarma mmmmm……

    ciao!
    mark

  • Jared in NYC
    2 May 2006

    Ooooh, I get it completely now – this is what New Yorkers call Souvlaki, and it IS very excellent, especially with fresh tomatoes and a nice tahini sauce. Two friends at work are from eastern Turkey, so I can ask about family recipes and other variations. yum!

    One day I will definitely make it to Bahrain, and I can get even closer than Zurich, as business will likely take me to India next year or sooner. As a believer in positive imaging, I am imagining myself munching one (paid for by Mark the generous ShawarmaBoy, or prepared at Mahmood’s) whilst kicking around at the ruin of an old Dilmun fort 😉

  • ShawarmaBoy
    2 May 2006

    You can be my guest for all the SHAWARMA you care to dine on. Afterwards I will give you a personal tour around the Island to all of the great archeological sites. Besides your appetite, pack your golf clubs, scuba gear and horse riding attire. Your gonna need it.

  • mahmood
    2 May 2006

    Yay, sounds like a good plan!

  • CerebralWaste
    3 May 2006

    Mahmood

    Hurry up and “acquire” some golf clubs! Riffa is calling!!

  • mahmood
    3 May 2006

    No no, thanks. I have far too many distractions as it is, adding one more will just get me thrown out of the house!

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