Dr. Munira Fakhro

Dr. Munira Fakhro“When the political turmoil happened in the 1990s, I signed a petition for the return of democracy and for a parliament, as one of the fourteen leaders, and the only woman, I added a paragraph on women’s equality. I realised there was great injustice during the 1990s which was happening to a large number of Bahraini people, those who were against the government.”

Then, along with 350 other women, she wrote another, sharper petition, which was sent to the late Amir Shaikh Isa bin Salman Al Khalifa in 1995. She and many others were suspended or fired from their jobs. She went to America for several years as a visiting scholar to Columbia, her alma mater, and then to Harvard where she presented the Bahraini case for democracy. She returned in 2001 to Bahrain and to the university.

As a member of the political association, The National Democratic Action Society, she believes, “You cannot separate democracy from other women’s causes … I believe that men and women should work together, for women or men or the whole society. We have so many men who believe in such issues (women’s rights), who work with us either at the university as scholars or at the political association.”

Bahrain is in fine form, as long as she continues to produce people like Dr. Munira Fakhro, a person who should be emulated and respected for all the sacrifices she already offered and continues to do so daily.

Looking at some of her various scientific and political contributions, I realise now that she not only touched Bahrain, but through her work she also influenced countless others in the world too.

It is people like Dr. Fakhro who should be celebrated, and roads and towns should be named after them, because their contribution to this society far outweighs what society can actually give them back.

And I would rather have her in parliament, helping and deciding Bahrain’s future, than the whole bunch who occupy it at the moment.

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19 Comments
  • Chanad
    20 April 2006

    hats off to the lady. we haven’t heard much from her in recent years though unfortunately.

  • Ibn
    20 April 2006

    Mahmood,

    You’re elbow deep in politics…why dont you enter parliament or another job as an Arab reformer?

    -Ibn

  • mahmood
    20 April 2006

    don’t have enough money to be able to do that… got mouths to feed and schools to pay for and humungous loans that require more than a pound of flesh to service… so, real life takes over unfortunately, though I would dearly love to do what you propose!

  • Ibn
    20 April 2006

    Perhaps once your kids stand up on their own you can enter?

    -ibn

  • mahmood
    20 April 2006

    I have no problem with that at all actually Ibn. Public service is an aspiration. (do I sound like a politician yet? ;))

  • Anonymous
    20 April 2006

    She kind of looks like you.

  • Anonymous
    20 April 2006

    AHAHHAHAHA ture true. didnt realise.

  • Gizmo
    21 April 2006

    When/if mahmood enters the poltical scene he will be more carefull when blogging :D.

  • mahmood
    21 April 2006

    That would be the conundrum Gizmo won’t it?

    I’ll have to decide whether the blog is just my ‘window’ to let my constituents know what I would be doing, or will it be a rant about anything and everything? I think by definition unfortunately it would be the former.

  • Ibn
    21 April 2006

    I’ll have to decide whether the blog is just my ‘window’ to let my constituents know what I would be doing, or will it be a rant about anything and everything? I think by definition unfortunately it would be the former.

    ….you could have two blogs Mahmood!

    The one where you unwind, rant, generalise, and essentially just let loose, doing as little thinking as possible in order to relax…

    and the other where you make more coherent well thought out posts, outlining your policies, and how to go about to reform using logic.

    Presumably, Steve will find himself more at home in the former. 😉

    -Ibn

  • Adel
    21 April 2006

    Mahmood, enter parliament and you will be able to pay your debts, secure a pension, and a new BMW 7 series to top it all.

  • Adel
    21 April 2006

    First vote for Mahmood, who seconds .

  • Ibn
    21 April 2006

    Mahmood, enter parliament and you will be able to pay your debts, secure a pension, and a new BMW 7 series to top it all.

    Securing a pension, pay *all* debts, and a new BMW7 series?

    Hmm…how many Bahraini taxpayers are going to be paying for all of those I wonder. Perhaps you would be willing to give the first Dinar towards those commodities then eh?

    -Ibn

  • Ingrid
    22 April 2006

    I’m with Ibn AND Gizmo…it is still ‘Gulf politics’ and being too outspoken could make it harder to be in politics proper (seeing that you would not make any decisions by yourself and need to convince others to want the same) but…you could start another blog and start up a grass roots popular base so when the time comes, you will already have a good following. Perhaps you will even have created your own political influence without being in Parliament..hmmm..
    Now as to comment on the lady you wrote about. It strikes me that when ever Middle Eastern women do get to be educated and show an interest in politics, they are better versed, more intellectually challenging (since they don’t rely on the ol’ boys network to get where they are) AND unfortunately (well, take that with a grain of salt) are a challenge to the societal/governmental version of Islam in terms of women’s rights. Have you ever heard of Fatima Mernissi? (Morrocan Islamic feminist)

  • jasra-jedi
    23 April 2006

    Ibn – what Bahraini tax payers?

    No taxation in this town. Just a welfare state spoiled populace that has a fundamental addiction to government subsidies. And a government that is extremely busy running around in circles. And a parliament that is learning how to drive BMW’s.

    The country’s saving grace? Mahmood. Mahmood for Parliament. Mahmood for Minister. Mahmood for Prime Minister. 😉

  • mahmood
    23 April 2006

    Wow! Now that’s a good thought to leave the office after an excellent lunch with and even more excellent friend and go watch the race! 😀

  • Ibn
    24 April 2006

    Jasra,

    Ibn – what Bahraini tax payers?

    The ones that would be taxed once Mahmood wins the presidency and works to remove all oil subsidies and welfare hand outs that destroy incentive, while instituting a tax base from where government gets its funds. 🙂

    -Ibn

  • mahmood
    24 April 2006

    now that’s a plan! 😉

  • Sadek
    24 April 2006

    It’s the Beamer (go for the Beamer 7 series), Merc or Lexus the unearned salary, the bigger benefits (earned thru your downtime in the assembly + contributions before the elections (from where?)) and the BD1,200 retirement benefit, added on to saying all kinds rambling and unthought musings that you can come out with during the “working” day (and being quoted daily by the unselective press) that should encourage you, Mahmood, to run for parliament.

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